Consequences of workplace bullying on employee identification and satisfaction among australians and singaporeans

Jennifer Loh, Simon Lloyd D. Restubog, Thomas J. Zagenczyk

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This study responds to the call for cross-cultural investigations of workplace bullying by examining the relationship between workplace bullying and attitudes among employees from two countries. The authors argue that employees from societies that are less inclined to accept that power differences exist as a result of structure (low power distance countries, e.g., Australia) will respond to workplace bullying more negatively than will employees from cultures that accept that power differences exist as a result of structure (high power distance, e.g., Singapore). In all, 165 Singaporean and 152 Australian employees completed surveys designed to assess workplace bullying, workgroup identification, and job satisfaction. Results showed that workplace bullying was negatively related to both workgroup identification and job satisfaction among employees from both countries. Moreover, national culture influenced the relationship between bullying and job satisfaction and workgroup identification such that the negative relationships between bullying and these attitudinal outcomes were stronger for Australians than Singaporeans.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)236-252
Number of pages17
JournalJournal of Cross-Cultural Psychology
Volume41
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2010
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Bullying
Workplace
exclusion
workplace
employee
Job Satisfaction
job satisfaction
national culture
Singapore
Identification (Psychology)
Power (Psychology)
society

Keywords

  • Culture
  • Job satisfaction
  • Workgroup identification
  • Workplace bullying

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Cultural Studies
  • Anthropology

Cite this

Consequences of workplace bullying on employee identification and satisfaction among australians and singaporeans. / Loh, Jennifer; Restubog, Simon Lloyd D.; Zagenczyk, Thomas J.

In: Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology, Vol. 41, No. 2, 01.03.2010, p. 236-252.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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