Concurrent measures of contralateral suppression of transient-evoked otoacoustic emissions and of auditory steady-state responses

Ian B. Mertes, Marjorie R. Leek

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Contralateral suppression of otoacoustic emissions (OAEs) is frequently used to assess the medial olivocochlear (MOC) efferent system, and may have clinical utility. However, OAEs are weak or absent in hearing-impaired ears, so little is known about MOC function in the presence of hearing loss. A potential alternative measure is contralateral suppression of the auditory steady-state response (ASSR) because ASSRs are measurable in many hearing-impaired ears. This study compared contralateral suppression of both transient-evoked otoacoustic emissions (TEOAEs) and ASSRs in a group of ten primarily older adults with either normal hearing or mild sensorineural hearing loss. Responses were elicited using 75-dB peak sound pressure level clicks. The MOC was activated using contralateral broadband noise at 60 dB sound pressure level. Measurements were made concurrently to ensure a consistent attentional state between the two measures. The magnitude of contralateral suppression of ASSRs was significantly larger than contralateral suppression of TEOAEs. Both measures usually exhibited high test-retest reliability within a session. However, there was no significant correlation between the magnitude of contralateral suppression of TEOAEs and of ASSRs. Further work is needed to understand the role of the MOC in contralateral suppression of ASSRs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2027-2038
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of the Acoustical Society of America
Volume140
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2016

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Acoustics and Ultrasonics

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