Concealment of a Sexual Minority Identity in the Workplace: The Role of Workplace Climate and Identity Centrality

Elizabeth Grace Holman, Brian G. Ogolsky, Ramona Faith Oswald

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Concealing a sexual minority identity at work has been linked to adverse health and employment outcomes. The authors of this paper examine whether LGBQ employee levels of concealment from coworkers and supervisors are linked to perceived workplace climate and LGBQ-identity centrality. Rainbow Illinois 2010–2011 data were used; N = 319 LGBQ full or part-time employees. Multiple regression with moderation was used to test the hypotheses. Support and hostility in the workplace each had a negative main effect on concealment from coworkers as well as supervisors. The interaction between support and centrality was also significant. LGBQ employees who placed greater importance on their sexual orientation were more likely to disclose that identity to supervisors in the face of hostility than those with less central identities. Thus, sexual minorities may be more responsive to workplace climate when they have more central identities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Homosexuality
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2021

Keywords

  • Disclosure
  • LGBQ identities
  • identity centrality
  • minority stress theory
  • workplace climate

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gender Studies
  • Social Psychology
  • Education
  • Psychology(all)

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