Abstract

Computational materials modeling and design has emerged as a vital component of materials research and development in academic, industrial, and national lab settings. In response, US Materials Science and Engineering (MatSE) departments and the federal government recognize the need to incorporate computational training into undergraduate MatSE education. Our faculty team at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC) is addressing this growing need with a comprehensive computational component integrated into the MatSE curriculum. Throughout their coursework, undergraduates complete a series of computational modules of progressing complexity, each module modeling the principles taught in its containing course. Computational lectures accompany most modules and further illustrate how computational methods solve real-life science and engineering problems. The computational curriculum is supported by a dedicated teaching assistant who helps with module development, delivers computational lectures, and offers additional office hours. Now, three years since initial implementation, multiple student cohorts have experienced the computational curriculum at all course levels. In this paper, we present new results on the efficacy of the computational curriculum and share more information about our continued efforts to improve the computational modules, lectures, and their integration within the broader MatSE curriculum.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalASEE Annual Conference and Exposition, Conference Proceedings
Volume2017-June
StatePublished - Jun 24 2017
Event124th ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition - Columbus, United States
Duration: Jun 25 2017Jun 28 2017

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Materials science
Curricula
Engineering education
Computational methods
Teaching
Students

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)

Cite this

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title = "Computational curriculum for MatSE undergraduates",
abstract = "Computational materials modeling and design has emerged as a vital component of materials research and development in academic, industrial, and national lab settings. In response, US Materials Science and Engineering (MatSE) departments and the federal government recognize the need to incorporate computational training into undergraduate MatSE education. Our faculty team at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC) is addressing this growing need with a comprehensive computational component integrated into the MatSE curriculum. Throughout their coursework, undergraduates complete a series of computational modules of progressing complexity, each module modeling the principles taught in its containing course. Computational lectures accompany most modules and further illustrate how computational methods solve real-life science and engineering problems. The computational curriculum is supported by a dedicated teaching assistant who helps with module development, delivers computational lectures, and offers additional office hours. Now, three years since initial implementation, multiple student cohorts have experienced the computational curriculum at all course levels. In this paper, we present new results on the efficacy of the computational curriculum and share more information about our continued efforts to improve the computational modules, lectures, and their integration within the broader MatSE curriculum.",
author = "Alina Kononov and Pascal Bellon and Bretl, {Timothy Wolfe} and Andrew Ferguson and Herman, {Geoffrey Lindsay} and Kilian, {Kristopher Alan} and Krogstad, {Jessica Anne} and {Das Neves Barbosa Leal Lauten}, Cecilia and Maass, {Christoph Robert Eduard} and Andre Schleife and Shang, {Jian Ku} and Dallas Trinkle and Matthew West",
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AU - Kononov, Alina

AU - Bellon, Pascal

AU - Bretl, Timothy Wolfe

AU - Ferguson, Andrew

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AU - Kilian, Kristopher Alan

AU - Krogstad, Jessica Anne

AU - Das Neves Barbosa Leal Lauten, Cecilia

AU - Maass, Christoph Robert Eduard

AU - Schleife, Andre

AU - Shang, Jian Ku

AU - Trinkle, Dallas

AU - West, Matthew

PY - 2017/6/24

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N2 - Computational materials modeling and design has emerged as a vital component of materials research and development in academic, industrial, and national lab settings. In response, US Materials Science and Engineering (MatSE) departments and the federal government recognize the need to incorporate computational training into undergraduate MatSE education. Our faculty team at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC) is addressing this growing need with a comprehensive computational component integrated into the MatSE curriculum. Throughout their coursework, undergraduates complete a series of computational modules of progressing complexity, each module modeling the principles taught in its containing course. Computational lectures accompany most modules and further illustrate how computational methods solve real-life science and engineering problems. The computational curriculum is supported by a dedicated teaching assistant who helps with module development, delivers computational lectures, and offers additional office hours. Now, three years since initial implementation, multiple student cohorts have experienced the computational curriculum at all course levels. In this paper, we present new results on the efficacy of the computational curriculum and share more information about our continued efforts to improve the computational modules, lectures, and their integration within the broader MatSE curriculum.

AB - Computational materials modeling and design has emerged as a vital component of materials research and development in academic, industrial, and national lab settings. In response, US Materials Science and Engineering (MatSE) departments and the federal government recognize the need to incorporate computational training into undergraduate MatSE education. Our faculty team at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC) is addressing this growing need with a comprehensive computational component integrated into the MatSE curriculum. Throughout their coursework, undergraduates complete a series of computational modules of progressing complexity, each module modeling the principles taught in its containing course. Computational lectures accompany most modules and further illustrate how computational methods solve real-life science and engineering problems. The computational curriculum is supported by a dedicated teaching assistant who helps with module development, delivers computational lectures, and offers additional office hours. Now, three years since initial implementation, multiple student cohorts have experienced the computational curriculum at all course levels. In this paper, we present new results on the efficacy of the computational curriculum and share more information about our continued efforts to improve the computational modules, lectures, and their integration within the broader MatSE curriculum.

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