Composition and distribution of lice (Insecta: Phthiraptera) on Colombian and Peruvian birds: New data on louse-host association in the Neotropics

Juliana Soto-Patiño, Gustavo A. Londoño, Kevin P. Johnson, Jason D. Weckstein, Jorge Enrique Avendaño, Therese A. Catanach, Andrew D. Sweet, Andrew T. Cook, Jill E. Jankowski, Julie Allen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The diversity of permanent ectoparasites is likely underestimated due to the difficulty of collecting samples. Lice (Insecta: Phthiraptera) are permanent ectoparasites of birds and mammals; there are approximately 5,000 species described and many more undescribed, particularly in the Neotropics. We document the louse genera collected from birds sampled in Peru (2006-2007) and Colombia (2009-2016), from 22 localities across a variety of ecosystems, ranging from lowland tropical forest and Llanos to high elevation cloud forest. We identified 35 louse genera from a total of 210 bird species belonging to 37 avian families and 13 orders. These genera belong to two suborders and three families of lice: Amblycera, families Menoponidae (present on 131 bird species) and Ricinidae (39 bird species); and Ischnocera, family Philopteridae (119 bird species). We compared our birdlouse associations with data in Price et al. (2003) and recently published Neotropical studies. The majority of bird-louse associations (51.9%) were new, with most of these coming from Passeriformes, the most diverse avian order, with the most poorly known louse fauna. Finally, we found geographical variation in louse infestation and prevalence rates. With this study, we report the first comprehensive documentation of bird-louse associations for Colombia and substantially increase the known associations documented for Peru.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere21635
JournalBiodiversity Data Journal
Volume6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2018

Fingerprint

Psocodea
louse
lice
Insecta
bird
birds
ectoparasite
ectoparasites
Peru
Colombia
Amblycera
Menoponidae
Philopteridae
Ischnocera
lice infestations
cloud forest
Passeriformes
tropical montane cloud forests
distribution
lowland forests

Keywords

  • Ectoparasites
  • Feather lice
  • Tropical forests

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Ecology

Cite this

Composition and distribution of lice (Insecta : Phthiraptera) on Colombian and Peruvian birds: New data on louse-host association in the Neotropics. / Soto-Patiño, Juliana; Londoño, Gustavo A.; Johnson, Kevin P.; Weckstein, Jason D.; Avendaño, Jorge Enrique; Catanach, Therese A.; Sweet, Andrew D.; Cook, Andrew T.; Jankowski, Jill E.; Allen, Julie.

In: Biodiversity Data Journal, Vol. 6, e21635, 01.01.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Soto-Patiño, J, Londoño, GA, Johnson, KP, Weckstein, JD, Avendaño, JE, Catanach, TA, Sweet, AD, Cook, AT, Jankowski, JE & Allen, J 2018, 'Composition and distribution of lice (Insecta: Phthiraptera) on Colombian and Peruvian birds: New data on louse-host association in the Neotropics', Biodiversity Data Journal, vol. 6, e21635. https://doi.org/10.3897/BDJ.6.e21635
Soto-Patiño, Juliana ; Londoño, Gustavo A. ; Johnson, Kevin P. ; Weckstein, Jason D. ; Avendaño, Jorge Enrique ; Catanach, Therese A. ; Sweet, Andrew D. ; Cook, Andrew T. ; Jankowski, Jill E. ; Allen, Julie. / Composition and distribution of lice (Insecta : Phthiraptera) on Colombian and Peruvian birds: New data on louse-host association in the Neotropics. In: Biodiversity Data Journal. 2018 ; Vol. 6.
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