Comparison of space-based and object-based models of visual attention

Arthur F Kramer, Andrew Jacobson

Research output: Contribution to journalConference article

Abstract

In the present study we examined the degree to which contour and color could be used to minimize focused attention costs. Twelve subjects performed a task in which they were instructed to respond to a centrally located stimulus and ignore flanking items. The flankers could be either compatible or incompatible with the response of the target. Additionally, the flankers could be embedded in the same object as the target or embedded in different objects. When the target and flankers were embedded in the same object, performance was poorer when the target was surrounded by response incompatible items than when it was surrounded by compatible items. However, the response compatibility effect was eliminated when the target and flankers were embedded in different objects. The results are interpreted within a hybrid space/object-based model of visual attention.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1489-1493
Number of pages5
JournalProceedings of the Human Factors Society
StatePublished - Dec 1 1990
EventProceedings of the Human Factors Society 34th Annual Meeting - Orlando '90 - Orlando, FL, USA
Duration: Oct 8 1990Oct 12 1990

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Comparison of space-based and object-based models of visual attention. / Kramer, Arthur F; Jacobson, Andrew.

In: Proceedings of the Human Factors Society, 01.12.1990, p. 1489-1493.

Research output: Contribution to journalConference article

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AB - In the present study we examined the degree to which contour and color could be used to minimize focused attention costs. Twelve subjects performed a task in which they were instructed to respond to a centrally located stimulus and ignore flanking items. The flankers could be either compatible or incompatible with the response of the target. Additionally, the flankers could be embedded in the same object as the target or embedded in different objects. When the target and flankers were embedded in the same object, performance was poorer when the target was surrounded by response incompatible items than when it was surrounded by compatible items. However, the response compatibility effect was eliminated when the target and flankers were embedded in different objects. The results are interpreted within a hybrid space/object-based model of visual attention.

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