Comparison of serologic testing and slaughter evaluation for assessing the effects of subclinical infection on growth in pigs

Gertraud Regula, Carol A. Lichtensteiger, Nohra E. Mateus-Pinilla, Gail Scherba, Gay Y. Miller, Ronald M. Weigel

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Objective - To compare serologic testing with slaughter evaluation in assessing effects of subclinical infection on average daily weight gain (ADG) in pigs. Design - Cohort study. Animals - 18 cohorts (30 to 35 pigs/cohort) of pigs on 7 farms. Procedure - Blood samples were collected, and pigs were weighed at 8, 16, and 24 weeks of age. Sera were tested for antibodies to porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV), swine influenza virus (SIV), transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV), pseudorabies virus, Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae, and Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae. At slaughter, skin, nasal turbinates, lungs, and liver were examined. Associations between ADG and results of serologic testing and slaughter evaluation were examined by use of multiple linear regression. Results - Pathogens that had a significant effect on any given farm during any given year and the magnitude of that effect varied. However, at 16 and 24 weeks of age, a higher antibody titer was consistently associated with a lower ADG. Mean differences in ADG between seropositive and seronegative pigs were 18 g/d (0.04 lb/d) for SIV, 40 g/d (0.09 lb/d) for PRRSV, 38 g/d (0.08 lb/d) for M hyopneumoniae, and 116 g/d (0.26 lb/d) for TGEV. Of the evaluations performed at slaughter, only detection of lung lesions was consistently associated with a decrease in ADG. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance - Results suggest that subclinical infection with any of a variety of pathogens commonly found in swine herds was associated with a decrease in ADG. Serologic testing was more effective than slaughter evaluation in assessing the impact of subclinical infection on ADG in these pigs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)888-895
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
Volume217
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 15 2000

Fingerprint

Asymptomatic Infections
slaughter
Swine
weight gain
Weight Gain
swine
Growth
infection
Transmissible gastroenteritis virus
testing
Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus
Porcine respiratory and reproductive syndrome virus
Influenza A virus
Orthomyxoviridae
lungs
Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae
farms
Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae
antibodies
Suid herpesvirus 1

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

Comparison of serologic testing and slaughter evaluation for assessing the effects of subclinical infection on growth in pigs. / Regula, Gertraud; Lichtensteiger, Carol A.; Mateus-Pinilla, Nohra E.; Scherba, Gail; Miller, Gay Y.; Weigel, Ronald M.

In: Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, Vol. 217, No. 6, 15.09.2000, p. 888-895.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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