Comparison of Self-Tracking Health Practices, eHealth Literacy, and Subjective Well-Being Between College Students With and Without Disabilities: Cross-Sectional Survey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: College students with disabilities need to transition from pediatric-centered care to adult care. However, they may become overwhelmed by multiple responsibilities, such as academic activities, peer relationships, career preparation, job seeking, independent living, as well as managing their health and promoting healthy behaviors. Objective: As the use of smartphones and wearable devices for collecting personal health data becomes popular, this study aimed to compare the characteristics of self-tracking health practices between college students with disabilities and their counterparts. In addition, this study examined the relationships between disability status, self-tracking health practices, eHealth literacy, and subjective well-being among college students. Methods: The web-based questionnaire was designed using Qualtrics for the cross-sectional online survey. The survey data were collected from February 2023 to April 2023 and included responses from 702 participants. Results: More than 80% (563/702, 80.2%) of the respondents participated voluntarily in self-tracking health practices. College students with disabilities (n=83) showed significantly lower levels of eHealth literacy and subjective well-being compared with college students without disabilities (n=619). The group with disabilities reported significantly lower satisfaction (t411=--5.97, P
Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere48783
JournalJMIR Formative Research
Volume8
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 10 2024

Keywords

  • college students
  • personal health data
  • self-tracking
  • eHealth literacy
  • well-being
  • tracking
  • students
  • disability
  • cross-sectional survey
  • pediatric care
  • adult care
  • smartphone health app
  • application
  • literacy

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