Comparison of raw starch hydrolyzing enzyme with conventional liquefaction and saccharification enzymes in dry-grind corn processing

Ping Wang, Vijay Singh, Hua Xue, David B. Johnston, Kent D. Rausch, M. E. Tumbleson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

In a conventional dry-grind corn process, starch is converted into dextrins using liquefaction enzymes at high temperatures (90-120°C) during a liquefaction step. Dextrins are hydrolyzed into sugars using saccharification enzymes during a simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) step. Recently, a raw starch hydrolyzing enzyme (RSH), Stargen 001, was developed that converts starch into dextrins at low temperatures (<48°C) and hydrolyzes dextrins into sugars during SSF. In this study, a dry-grind corn process using RSH enzyme was compared with two combinations (DG1 and DG2) of commercial liquefaction and saccharification enzymes. Dry-grind corn processes for all enzyme treatments were performed at the same process conditions except for the liquefaction step. For RSH and DG1 and DG2 treatments, ethanol concentrations at 72 hr of fermentation were 14.1-14.2% (v/v). All three enzyme treatments resulted in comparable ethanol conversion efficiencies, ethanol yields, and DDGS yields. Sugar profiles for the RSH treatment were different from DG1 and DG2 treatments, especially for glucose. During SSF, the highest glucose concentration for RSH treatment was 7% (w/v), whereas for DG1 and DG2 treatments, glucose concentrations had maximum of 19% (w/v). Glycerol concentrations were 0.5% (w/v) for RSH treatment and 0.8% (w/v) for DG1 and DG2 treatments.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)10-14
Number of pages5
JournalCereal Chemistry
Volume84
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2007

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Organic Chemistry

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