Comparison of body temperature readings between an implantable microchip and a cloacal probe in lorikeets (Trichoglossus haematodus sp.)

Christine Hoskinson, Stephanie Mccain, Matthew C. Allender

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Body temperature readings can be a useful diagnostic tool for identifying the presence of subclinical disease. Traditionally, rectal or cloacal thermometry has been used to obtain body temperatures. The use of implantable microchips to obtain these temperatures has been studied in a variety of animals, but not yet in avian species. Initially, timepoint one (T1), nine lorikeets were anesthetized via facemask induction with 5% isoflurane and maintained at 2-3% for microchip placement and body temperature data collection. Body temperature was measured at 0 and 2min post-anesthetic induction both cloacally, using a Cardell veterinary monitor and also via implantable microchip, utilizing a universal scanner. On two more occasions, timepoints two and three (T2, T3), the same nine lorikeets were manually restrained to obtain body temperature readings both cloacally and via microchip, again at minutes 0 and 2. There was no statistical difference between body temperatures, for both methods, at T1. Microchip temperatures were statistically different than cloacal temperatures at T2 and T3. Body temperatures at T1, were statistically different from those obtained at T2 and T3 for both methods. Additional studies are warranted to verify the accuracy of microchip core body temperature readings in avian species. Zoo Biol. 33:452-454, 2014.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)452-454
Number of pages3
JournalZoo Biology
Volume33
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2014

Keywords

  • Body temperature
  • Lorikeet
  • Microchip
  • Thermometry

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Animal Science and Zoology

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