Comparison of AFLP and pedigree-based genetic diversity asessment methods using wheat cultivars from the Pacific Northwest

B. A. Barrett, K. K. Kidwell, P. N. Fox

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Comparing results of different genetic diversity estimation methods may be indicative of their utility as parental selection tools for plant breeders. Forty-three spring and winter wheat lines (Triticum aestivum L.) from the Pacific Northwest (PNW) were used to compare pedigree and amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP)-based genetic diversity estimates (GDE(PED) and GDE(AFLP), respectively). The mean of the 903 GDE(PED) pairwise comparisons was 0.96, and 89% of the values were >0.90. In contrast, GDE(AFLP) may have more utility than GDE(PED) for identifying parental combinations with maximum allelic variation. Despite the substantially different means and distributions of the two diversity measures, a moderate rank correlation (r, = 0.42, P < 0.001) was detected between the two GDE matrices. AFLP fragments from hypomethylated portions of the genome (generated with Pst I:MSE I) were more highly associated with GDE(PED) than were fragments generated with the methylation insensitive combination Eco RI:MSE I (r, = 0.44 and 0.28, respectively). Pedigree and AFLP-based GDEs detected a similar hierarchical patterns of genetic variation among individuals, it may be adequate for assessing overall patterns of genetic variation among regionally adapted germplasm. It remains to be determined which method, if either, provides predictive estimates of heterosis or genetic variance among progeny from specific parental combinations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1271-1278
Number of pages8
JournalCrop Science
Volume38
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1998
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agronomy and Crop Science

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