Comparative analysis of phenolic content and profile, antioxidant capacity, and anti-inflammatory bioactivity in wild alaskan and commercial vaccinium berries

Mary H. Grace, Debora Esposito, Kriya L. Dunlap, Mary Ann Lila

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Wild Alaskan Vaccinium berries, V. vitis-idaea (lowbush cranberry) and V. uliginosum (bog blueberry), were investigated in parallel with their commercial berry counterparts, V. macrocarpon (cranberry) and V. angustifolium (lowbush blueberry). Lowbush cranberry accumulated about twice the total phenolics (624.4 mg/100 g FW) and proanthocyanidins (278.8 mg/100 g) content as commercial cranberries, but A-type proanthocyanidins were more prevalent in the latter. Bog blueberry anthocyanin and total phenolic contents of 220 and 504.5 mg/100 g, respectively, significantly exceeded those of the lowbush blueberry. Chlorogenic acid, however, was quite high in lowbush blueberry (83.1 mg/100 g), but undetected in bog blueberry, and the proanthocyanidins of lowbush blueberry had significantly higher levels of polymerization. Antioxidant capacity (DPPH, APTS, and FRAP) correlated with phenolic content for each berry. A polyphenol-rich fraction from lowbush cranberry exhibited dose-dependent inhibition of LPS-elicited induction of IL-1β in RAW 264.7 cells, indicative of strong anti-inflammatory activity. These results corroborate the historic use of wild Alaskan berries as medicinally important foods in Alaska Native communities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)4007-4017
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry
Volume62
Issue number18
DOIs
StatePublished - May 7 2014
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • V. angustifolium
  • V. macrocarpon
  • V. uliginosum
  • Vaccinium vitis-idaea
  • anti-inflammatory
  • antioxidant
  • phenolics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Chemistry(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

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