Community Composition and Structure of Submerged Detritus Inhabiting Fungi Across Temperate Peatland and Stream Habitats

Daniel Raudabaugh, Andrew N. Miller

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

We examine species distributional patterns within a phylogenetic framework to refine our understanding of temperate peatland and alkaline stream fungal communities, species distributional patterns, and provide a robust framework to elucidate how major groups of fungal taxa are distributed across multiple habitats. Using both culture-dependent and culture-independent techniques, we examined how habitat, geography, and phylogeny influence the structure of detritus-inhabiting fungal communities. Results indicated that all sites contain numerous unidentified, abundant taxa but that stream communities contain more species, have greater phylogenetic diversity, and possess greater phylogenetic distinctiveness as compared to peatlands. In addition, analysis of the nine most abundant fungal classes indicated that phylogenetic clustering was more prominent within peatland habitats as compared to stream habitats. Lastly, site variation had the greatest impact on community structure, followed by habitat, and region. This research allows for the integration of additional ecological, functional and phylogenetic information further refining our understanding of fungal community ecology.
Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication87th Annual Meeting Mycological Society of America 2019 Annual Meeting; 10-14 August 2019, Minneapoli, Minnesota
StatePublished - 2019

Keywords

  • INHS

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