Abstract

This article analyzes textual constructions of Black Latinidad and negotiations of ethnic and racial identity in the cultural commodification of Black Latina/o actors. It documents the ambivalent process of cultural commodification for producing polysemic texts of Black Latinidad that counter dominant constructions of Latinidad as "brown" and exists in tension with dominant understandings of US Black identity as static and unchanging. By expanding on research (Balaji, 2009; Saha, 2012; Watts & Orbe, 2002) that positions actors as willing participants in the production and distribution of themselves as commodities that may accumulate capital, this article situates cultural representations of Black Latinidad in mainstream film and television to articulate the conditions under which Black Latina/o actors gain value as commodities through the accumulation of racial capital.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)211-226
Number of pages16
JournalPopular Communication
Volume11
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2013

Fingerprint

Television
commodity
television
Values

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Communication

Cite this

Commodifying Black Latinidad in US Film and Television. / Molina-Guzmán, Isabel.

In: Popular Communication, Vol. 11, No. 3, 01.07.2013, p. 211-226.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{f9b2af45e2484a48b83353668f068226,
title = "Commodifying Black Latinidad in US Film and Television",
abstract = "This article analyzes textual constructions of Black Latinidad and negotiations of ethnic and racial identity in the cultural commodification of Black Latina/o actors. It documents the ambivalent process of cultural commodification for producing polysemic texts of Black Latinidad that counter dominant constructions of Latinidad as {"}brown{"} and exists in tension with dominant understandings of US Black identity as static and unchanging. By expanding on research (Balaji, 2009; Saha, 2012; Watts & Orbe, 2002) that positions actors as willing participants in the production and distribution of themselves as commodities that may accumulate capital, this article situates cultural representations of Black Latinidad in mainstream film and television to articulate the conditions under which Black Latina/o actors gain value as commodities through the accumulation of racial capital.",
author = "Isabel Molina-Guzm{\'a}n",
year = "2013",
month = "7",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1080/15405702.2013.810071",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "11",
pages = "211--226",
journal = "Popular Communication",
issn = "1540-5702",
publisher = "Routledge",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Commodifying Black Latinidad in US Film and Television

AU - Molina-Guzmán, Isabel

PY - 2013/7/1

Y1 - 2013/7/1

N2 - This article analyzes textual constructions of Black Latinidad and negotiations of ethnic and racial identity in the cultural commodification of Black Latina/o actors. It documents the ambivalent process of cultural commodification for producing polysemic texts of Black Latinidad that counter dominant constructions of Latinidad as "brown" and exists in tension with dominant understandings of US Black identity as static and unchanging. By expanding on research (Balaji, 2009; Saha, 2012; Watts & Orbe, 2002) that positions actors as willing participants in the production and distribution of themselves as commodities that may accumulate capital, this article situates cultural representations of Black Latinidad in mainstream film and television to articulate the conditions under which Black Latina/o actors gain value as commodities through the accumulation of racial capital.

AB - This article analyzes textual constructions of Black Latinidad and negotiations of ethnic and racial identity in the cultural commodification of Black Latina/o actors. It documents the ambivalent process of cultural commodification for producing polysemic texts of Black Latinidad that counter dominant constructions of Latinidad as "brown" and exists in tension with dominant understandings of US Black identity as static and unchanging. By expanding on research (Balaji, 2009; Saha, 2012; Watts & Orbe, 2002) that positions actors as willing participants in the production and distribution of themselves as commodities that may accumulate capital, this article situates cultural representations of Black Latinidad in mainstream film and television to articulate the conditions under which Black Latina/o actors gain value as commodities through the accumulation of racial capital.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84881630409&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84881630409&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1080/15405702.2013.810071

DO - 10.1080/15405702.2013.810071

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:84881630409

VL - 11

SP - 211

EP - 226

JO - Popular Communication

JF - Popular Communication

SN - 1540-5702

IS - 3

ER -