Commercially available avian and mammalian whole prey diet items targeted for consumption by managed exotic and domestic pet felines: Macronutrient, mineral, and long-chain fatty acid composition

Katherine R. Kerr, Kelly L. Kappen, Lindsay M. Garner, Kelly S Swanson

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

Abstract

Whole prey diets encourage species-typical behaviors making them popular in the zoo and home setting for captive exotic and domestic felids, respectively. We evaluated macronutrient, mineral, and long-chain fatty acid composition of 20 whole prey items: mice (1-2, 10-13, 21-25, 30-40, and 150-180 days of age); rats (1-4, 10-13, 21-25, 33-42, and >60 days of age); rabbits (still born, 30-45 days, >65 days with skin, and >65 days of age with skin removed); chicken (1-3 days of age, ground adult); duck (ground adult); and quail (1-3, 21-40, and >60 days of age). Composition of whole prey was highly variable (15-40% DM, 34-75% CP, 10-60% fat, and 8-18% ash). A majority of whole prey samples (15/20) had at least one mineral or fatty acid below AAFCO [] or NRC [] minimum recommended concentrations for domestic cats (K, Na, Cl, Mg, Cu, Mn, and/or Zn; total fat, linolenic acid, arachidonic acid and/or EPA and DHA). These data identify potential nutrient deficiencies allowing for alterations in dietary formulation prior to long-term feeding.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)327-335
Number of pages9
JournalZoo Biology
Volume33
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

Keywords

  • Cat
  • Diet composition
  • Feline nutrition
  • Proximate analysis
  • Raw diet

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Animal Science and Zoology

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