Combined ∆ 9 -tetrahydrocannabinol and moderate alcohol administration: effects on ingestive behaviors in adolescent male rats

Nnamdi G. Nelson, Wen Xuan Law, Michael J. Weingarten, Lauren N. Carnevale, Aditi Das, Nu-Chu Liang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Rationale: Whereas co-use of alcohol and marijuana is prevalent in adolescents, the effects of such drug co-exposure on ingestive and cognitive behaviors remain largely unexplored. We hypothesized that co-exposure to alcohol and ∆ 9 -tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the main psychoactive constitute of marijuana, alters feeding behavior and cognition differently from either drug alone. Methods: Male rats received daily THC (3–20 mg/kg/day) or oil vehicle through subcutaneous injection or consumption of a cookie with access to saccharin or saccharin-sweetened alcohol during adolescence (P30–45). Barnes maze and sucrose preference tests were applied to assess spatial memory and behavioral flexibility and abstinence-related anhedonia, respectively. Results: Subcutaneous THC did not affect alcohol intake but dose-dependently increased acute (3 h) chow intake and reduced weight gain. Moderate alcohol consumption reduced the acute hyperphagic effect of subcutaneous THC. By contrast, oral THC at a dose > 5 mg/kg robustly reduced alcohol intake without affecting 3-h chow intake. At this dose, some rats stopped consuming the THC-laced cookies. Furthermore, oral THC reduced weight gain, and co-exposure to alcohol alleviated this effect. Chronic subcutaneous, but not oral, THC reduced sucrose intake during abstinence. Neither treatment impaired cognitive behaviors in the Barnes maze. Conclusion: Moderate alcohol and THC consumption can interact to elicit unique outcomes on ingestive behaviors and energy balance. Importantly, this study established a novel model of voluntary alcohol and THC consumption for studying mechanisms underlying the consequences of adolescent onset co-use of the two drugs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)671-684
Number of pages14
JournalPsychopharmacology
Volume236
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 14 2019

Fingerprint

Adolescent Behavior
Dronabinol
Alcohols
Alcohol Drinking
Saccharin
Cannabis
Weight Gain
Sucrose
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Anhedonia
Feeding Behavior
Subcutaneous Injections
Cognition
Oils

Keywords

  • Adolescence
  • Alcohol
  • Barnes maze
  • Cognitive function
  • Ingestive behavior
  • Polydrug use
  • Sucrose preference
  • ∆ -tetrahydrocannabinol

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology

Cite this

Combined ∆ 9 -tetrahydrocannabinol and moderate alcohol administration : effects on ingestive behaviors in adolescent male rats. / Nelson, Nnamdi G.; Law, Wen Xuan; Weingarten, Michael J.; Carnevale, Lauren N.; Das, Aditi; Liang, Nu-Chu.

In: Psychopharmacology, Vol. 236, No. 2, 14.02.2019, p. 671-684.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Nelson, Nnamdi G. ; Law, Wen Xuan ; Weingarten, Michael J. ; Carnevale, Lauren N. ; Das, Aditi ; Liang, Nu-Chu. / Combined ∆ 9 -tetrahydrocannabinol and moderate alcohol administration : effects on ingestive behaviors in adolescent male rats. In: Psychopharmacology. 2019 ; Vol. 236, No. 2. pp. 671-684.
@article{1f24a695398c4f62bf8ce30fa47c0b44,
title = "Combined ∆ 9 -tetrahydrocannabinol and moderate alcohol administration: effects on ingestive behaviors in adolescent male rats",
abstract = "Rationale: Whereas co-use of alcohol and marijuana is prevalent in adolescents, the effects of such drug co-exposure on ingestive and cognitive behaviors remain largely unexplored. We hypothesized that co-exposure to alcohol and ∆ 9 -tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the main psychoactive constitute of marijuana, alters feeding behavior and cognition differently from either drug alone. Methods: Male rats received daily THC (3–20 mg/kg/day) or oil vehicle through subcutaneous injection or consumption of a cookie with access to saccharin or saccharin-sweetened alcohol during adolescence (P30–45). Barnes maze and sucrose preference tests were applied to assess spatial memory and behavioral flexibility and abstinence-related anhedonia, respectively. Results: Subcutaneous THC did not affect alcohol intake but dose-dependently increased acute (3 h) chow intake and reduced weight gain. Moderate alcohol consumption reduced the acute hyperphagic effect of subcutaneous THC. By contrast, oral THC at a dose > 5 mg/kg robustly reduced alcohol intake without affecting 3-h chow intake. At this dose, some rats stopped consuming the THC-laced cookies. Furthermore, oral THC reduced weight gain, and co-exposure to alcohol alleviated this effect. Chronic subcutaneous, but not oral, THC reduced sucrose intake during abstinence. Neither treatment impaired cognitive behaviors in the Barnes maze. Conclusion: Moderate alcohol and THC consumption can interact to elicit unique outcomes on ingestive behaviors and energy balance. Importantly, this study established a novel model of voluntary alcohol and THC consumption for studying mechanisms underlying the consequences of adolescent onset co-use of the two drugs.",
keywords = "Adolescence, Alcohol, Barnes maze, Cognitive function, Ingestive behavior, Polydrug use, Sucrose preference, ∆ -tetrahydrocannabinol",
author = "Nelson, {Nnamdi G.} and Law, {Wen Xuan} and Weingarten, {Michael J.} and Carnevale, {Lauren N.} and Aditi Das and Nu-Chu Liang",
year = "2019",
month = "2",
day = "14",
doi = "10.1007/s00213-018-5093-3",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "236",
pages = "671--684",
journal = "Psychopharmacology",
issn = "0033-3158",
publisher = "Springer Verlag",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Combined ∆ 9 -tetrahydrocannabinol and moderate alcohol administration

T2 - effects on ingestive behaviors in adolescent male rats

AU - Nelson, Nnamdi G.

AU - Law, Wen Xuan

AU - Weingarten, Michael J.

AU - Carnevale, Lauren N.

AU - Das, Aditi

AU - Liang, Nu-Chu

PY - 2019/2/14

Y1 - 2019/2/14

N2 - Rationale: Whereas co-use of alcohol and marijuana is prevalent in adolescents, the effects of such drug co-exposure on ingestive and cognitive behaviors remain largely unexplored. We hypothesized that co-exposure to alcohol and ∆ 9 -tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the main psychoactive constitute of marijuana, alters feeding behavior and cognition differently from either drug alone. Methods: Male rats received daily THC (3–20 mg/kg/day) or oil vehicle through subcutaneous injection or consumption of a cookie with access to saccharin or saccharin-sweetened alcohol during adolescence (P30–45). Barnes maze and sucrose preference tests were applied to assess spatial memory and behavioral flexibility and abstinence-related anhedonia, respectively. Results: Subcutaneous THC did not affect alcohol intake but dose-dependently increased acute (3 h) chow intake and reduced weight gain. Moderate alcohol consumption reduced the acute hyperphagic effect of subcutaneous THC. By contrast, oral THC at a dose > 5 mg/kg robustly reduced alcohol intake without affecting 3-h chow intake. At this dose, some rats stopped consuming the THC-laced cookies. Furthermore, oral THC reduced weight gain, and co-exposure to alcohol alleviated this effect. Chronic subcutaneous, but not oral, THC reduced sucrose intake during abstinence. Neither treatment impaired cognitive behaviors in the Barnes maze. Conclusion: Moderate alcohol and THC consumption can interact to elicit unique outcomes on ingestive behaviors and energy balance. Importantly, this study established a novel model of voluntary alcohol and THC consumption for studying mechanisms underlying the consequences of adolescent onset co-use of the two drugs.

AB - Rationale: Whereas co-use of alcohol and marijuana is prevalent in adolescents, the effects of such drug co-exposure on ingestive and cognitive behaviors remain largely unexplored. We hypothesized that co-exposure to alcohol and ∆ 9 -tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the main psychoactive constitute of marijuana, alters feeding behavior and cognition differently from either drug alone. Methods: Male rats received daily THC (3–20 mg/kg/day) or oil vehicle through subcutaneous injection or consumption of a cookie with access to saccharin or saccharin-sweetened alcohol during adolescence (P30–45). Barnes maze and sucrose preference tests were applied to assess spatial memory and behavioral flexibility and abstinence-related anhedonia, respectively. Results: Subcutaneous THC did not affect alcohol intake but dose-dependently increased acute (3 h) chow intake and reduced weight gain. Moderate alcohol consumption reduced the acute hyperphagic effect of subcutaneous THC. By contrast, oral THC at a dose > 5 mg/kg robustly reduced alcohol intake without affecting 3-h chow intake. At this dose, some rats stopped consuming the THC-laced cookies. Furthermore, oral THC reduced weight gain, and co-exposure to alcohol alleviated this effect. Chronic subcutaneous, but not oral, THC reduced sucrose intake during abstinence. Neither treatment impaired cognitive behaviors in the Barnes maze. Conclusion: Moderate alcohol and THC consumption can interact to elicit unique outcomes on ingestive behaviors and energy balance. Importantly, this study established a novel model of voluntary alcohol and THC consumption for studying mechanisms underlying the consequences of adolescent onset co-use of the two drugs.

KW - Adolescence

KW - Alcohol

KW - Barnes maze

KW - Cognitive function

KW - Ingestive behavior

KW - Polydrug use

KW - Sucrose preference

KW - ∆ -tetrahydrocannabinol

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85056339398&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85056339398&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s00213-018-5093-3

DO - 10.1007/s00213-018-5093-3

M3 - Article

C2 - 30415276

AN - SCOPUS:85056339398

VL - 236

SP - 671

EP - 684

JO - Psychopharmacology

JF - Psychopharmacology

SN - 0033-3158

IS - 2

ER -