COINFECTION of California SEA LION ADENOVIRUS 1 and A NOVEL POLYOMAVIRUS in A HAWAIIAN MONK SEAL (NEOMONACHUS SCHAUINSLANDI)

Galaxia Cortés-Hinojosa, Bethany Doescher, Michael J Kinsel, John Lednicky, Julia Loeb, Thomas Waltzek, James F.X. Wellehan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The Hawaiian monk seal (Neomonachus schauinslandi) is an endangered species. Here, we present a clinical case of a 26-yr-old male Hawaiian monk seal (HMS) kept in an aquarium with a history of intermittent anorexia and evidence of renal disease. Histologic examination revealed eosinophilic intranuclear inclusions in the liver. Conventional nested PCR protocols were used to test for viruses, and it tested positive for adenovirus and polyomavirus, and negative for herpesvirus. The adenovirus partial polymerase gene is 100% homologous to that of California sea lion adenovirus 1 (CSLAdV-1). CSLAdV-1 causes viral hepatitis in CSL, and has recently been reported in different species of otariids in an aquarium in Japan (Otaria flavescens and Arctocephalus pusillus) and a sequence from Spain has been submitted in NCBI as Otaria flavescens adenovirus-1. The polyomavirus in this animal is a novel virus, and is the first polyomavirus discovered in Hawaiian monk seals. This new virus is designated Hawaiian monk seal polyomavirus (HMSPyV-1), and is 83% homologous to California sea lion Polyomavirus-1 (CSLPyV-1). This is the first report of viral coinfection in a HMS and clinical significance in this case remains unclear but may be associated with advanced age.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)427-437
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Zoo and Wildlife Medicine
Volume47
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2016

Keywords

  • CSLAdV-1
  • Hawaiian Monk seal
  • Polyomavirus
  • coinfection.
  • host jump
  • viral hepatitis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Animal Science and Zoology
  • veterinary(all)

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'COINFECTION of California SEA LION ADENOVIRUS 1 and A NOVEL POLYOMAVIRUS in A HAWAIIAN MONK SEAL (NEOMONACHUS SCHAUINSLANDI)'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this