Closing science-practice knowledge gaps

Contributions of psychological research to human resource management

Michael J. Burke, Fritz Drasgow, Jack E. Edwards

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Evidence of science-practice knowledge gaps among managers (Rynes, Colbert, & Brown, 2002), coupled with major changes occurring in the workplace over the last ten years, suggest the need for human resources practitioners to become as current as possible on how research findings can assist in improving the management of HR. Nine articles in this special issue provide rich information for understanding the contributions of psychological theories and research findings to HR management and, consequently, for closing science-practice knowledge gaps. More specifically, the articles bring together pairs of scientists and practitioners to address science-practice knowledge gaps in the areas of recruiting and selecting workers, managing performance, training and developing individuals, managing groups and teams, compensating employees, leading others, assessing employee attitudes, managing diversity, and managing downsizing. We hope these articles will stimulate and promote a broader perspective concerning the relevance and value of psychological research for improving HR practices and organizational functioning.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)299-304
Number of pages6
JournalHuman Resource Management
Volume43
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2004

Fingerprint

Human resource management
Personnel
Psychology
Research
Psychological Theory
Workplace
Managers
Professional Practice Gaps
Knowledge gap
Psychological

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Psychology
  • Strategy and Management
  • Organizational Behavior and Human Resource Management
  • Management of Technology and Innovation

Cite this

Closing science-practice knowledge gaps : Contributions of psychological research to human resource management. / Burke, Michael J.; Drasgow, Fritz; Edwards, Jack E.

In: Human Resource Management, Vol. 43, No. 4, 01.12.2004, p. 299-304.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

@article{6940403f50594cb2988a787264a1aa6a,
title = "Closing science-practice knowledge gaps: Contributions of psychological research to human resource management",
abstract = "Evidence of science-practice knowledge gaps among managers (Rynes, Colbert, & Brown, 2002), coupled with major changes occurring in the workplace over the last ten years, suggest the need for human resources practitioners to become as current as possible on how research findings can assist in improving the management of HR. Nine articles in this special issue provide rich information for understanding the contributions of psychological theories and research findings to HR management and, consequently, for closing science-practice knowledge gaps. More specifically, the articles bring together pairs of scientists and practitioners to address science-practice knowledge gaps in the areas of recruiting and selecting workers, managing performance, training and developing individuals, managing groups and teams, compensating employees, leading others, assessing employee attitudes, managing diversity, and managing downsizing. We hope these articles will stimulate and promote a broader perspective concerning the relevance and value of psychological research for improving HR practices and organizational functioning.",
author = "Burke, {Michael J.} and Fritz Drasgow and Edwards, {Jack E.}",
year = "2004",
month = "12",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1002/hrm.20025",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "43",
pages = "299--304",
journal = "Human Resource Management",
issn = "0090-4848",
publisher = "Wiley-Liss Inc.",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Closing science-practice knowledge gaps

T2 - Contributions of psychological research to human resource management

AU - Burke, Michael J.

AU - Drasgow, Fritz

AU - Edwards, Jack E.

PY - 2004/12/1

Y1 - 2004/12/1

N2 - Evidence of science-practice knowledge gaps among managers (Rynes, Colbert, & Brown, 2002), coupled with major changes occurring in the workplace over the last ten years, suggest the need for human resources practitioners to become as current as possible on how research findings can assist in improving the management of HR. Nine articles in this special issue provide rich information for understanding the contributions of psychological theories and research findings to HR management and, consequently, for closing science-practice knowledge gaps. More specifically, the articles bring together pairs of scientists and practitioners to address science-practice knowledge gaps in the areas of recruiting and selecting workers, managing performance, training and developing individuals, managing groups and teams, compensating employees, leading others, assessing employee attitudes, managing diversity, and managing downsizing. We hope these articles will stimulate and promote a broader perspective concerning the relevance and value of psychological research for improving HR practices and organizational functioning.

AB - Evidence of science-practice knowledge gaps among managers (Rynes, Colbert, & Brown, 2002), coupled with major changes occurring in the workplace over the last ten years, suggest the need for human resources practitioners to become as current as possible on how research findings can assist in improving the management of HR. Nine articles in this special issue provide rich information for understanding the contributions of psychological theories and research findings to HR management and, consequently, for closing science-practice knowledge gaps. More specifically, the articles bring together pairs of scientists and practitioners to address science-practice knowledge gaps in the areas of recruiting and selecting workers, managing performance, training and developing individuals, managing groups and teams, compensating employees, leading others, assessing employee attitudes, managing diversity, and managing downsizing. We hope these articles will stimulate and promote a broader perspective concerning the relevance and value of psychological research for improving HR practices and organizational functioning.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=10844275519&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=10844275519&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1002/hrm.20025

DO - 10.1002/hrm.20025

M3 - Review article

VL - 43

SP - 299

EP - 304

JO - Human Resource Management

JF - Human Resource Management

SN - 0090-4848

IS - 4

ER -