Clinical effect of hemoparasite infections in snowy owls (Bubo scandiacus)

Kendra C. Baker, Christy L. Rettenmund, Samantha J. Sander, Anne E. Rivas, Kaitlin C. Green, Lisa Mangus, Ellen Bronson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Vector-borne hemoparasites are commonly found in avian species. Plasmodium spp., the causative agent of avian malaria, are intraerythrocytic parasites that can cause signs ranging from subclinical infection to severe acute disease. In raptor species, most hemoparasites are associated with subclinical infection and are generally not treated when seen on blood evaluation. This case series reviews five cases of hemoparasite infection in snowy owls (Bubo scandiacus). These animals were infected with a variety of hemoparasites, including Plasmodium, Haemoproteus, and Leukocytozoon spp. Death of one of these birds due to hemoparasite burden led to a change in the monitoring for and treatment of subclinical hemoparasitic infections in this species. Three subsequently infected snowy owls have been treated with primaquine and chloroquine. The birds that were treated survived infection, and parasite burdens in peripheral blood diminished. Postulated reasons for increased morbidity and mortality associated with hemoparasitic infections in captive snowy owls, as opposed to other raptor species, include stress, concurrent disease, novel pathogen exposure, and elevated environmental temperatures.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)143-152
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Zoo and Wildlife Medicine
Volume49
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2018
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Strigiformes
Asymptomatic Infections
Raptors
Plasmodium
Birds
Avian Malaria
Infection
infection
Primaquine
Parasitic Diseases
Environmental Exposure
Chloroquine
Acute Disease
birds of prey
Parasites
avian malaria
Morbidity
Haemoproteus
parasites
chloroquine

Keywords

  • Avian malaria
  • Bubo scandiacus
  • Haemoproteus
  • Hemoparasites
  • Plasmodium
  • Snowy owl

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Animal Science and Zoology
  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

Baker, K. C., Rettenmund, C. L., Sander, S. J., Rivas, A. E., Green, K. C., Mangus, L., & Bronson, E. (2018). Clinical effect of hemoparasite infections in snowy owls (Bubo scandiacus). Journal of Zoo and Wildlife Medicine, 49(1), 143-152. https://doi.org/10.1638/2017-0042R.1

Clinical effect of hemoparasite infections in snowy owls (Bubo scandiacus). / Baker, Kendra C.; Rettenmund, Christy L.; Sander, Samantha J.; Rivas, Anne E.; Green, Kaitlin C.; Mangus, Lisa; Bronson, Ellen.

In: Journal of Zoo and Wildlife Medicine, Vol. 49, No. 1, 01.03.2018, p. 143-152.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Baker, KC, Rettenmund, CL, Sander, SJ, Rivas, AE, Green, KC, Mangus, L & Bronson, E 2018, 'Clinical effect of hemoparasite infections in snowy owls (Bubo scandiacus)', Journal of Zoo and Wildlife Medicine, vol. 49, no. 1, pp. 143-152. https://doi.org/10.1638/2017-0042R.1
Baker, Kendra C. ; Rettenmund, Christy L. ; Sander, Samantha J. ; Rivas, Anne E. ; Green, Kaitlin C. ; Mangus, Lisa ; Bronson, Ellen. / Clinical effect of hemoparasite infections in snowy owls (Bubo scandiacus). In: Journal of Zoo and Wildlife Medicine. 2018 ; Vol. 49, No. 1. pp. 143-152.
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