Class, place and gender: Contested industrial and domestic space in Kohler, Wiscounsin, USA, 1920-1960

Kathryn J. Oberdeck

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The Kohler company, a family-owned plumbing manufactory in Wisconsin, USA, known for the 'garden industrial village' erected for its workers during the 1910s, managed class relations through a gendered spatial arrangement of its model town. In the 1930s and 1950s, unionists striking at the plant responded by articulating their class alliances within and outside the town in spatial terms that revised the meaning of the place. In the process, the Kohler unions also necessarily refigured domestic space in ways that challenged the company's mapping of domesticity in the 1930s, but they drew back from such challenges in the 1950s.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)97-137
Number of pages41
JournalGender and History
Volume13
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2001

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gender Studies
  • Geography, Planning and Development
  • History
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)

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