Cisplatin and 5-FU infusion chemotherapy in advanced, recurrent cancer of the head and neck: An Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group pilot study

K. M. Rowland, S. G. Taylor, A. S. Spiers, R. C. DeConti, M. R. O'Donnell, J. Showel, P. B. Stott, L. M. Milner, J. C. Marsh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Thirty-four patients with advanced, recurrent head and neck cancer were treated with cisplatin (100 mg/m2 on Day 1) and continuous-infusion 5-FU (1.0 g/m2/24 hours on Days 1-5) every 3-4 weeks. All but one patient had failed prior radiation therapy or surgery; 27 had failed both. Two patients were not evaluable for response because of death within the first 2 weeks from unrelated heart disease. Among 30 patients with squamous cell carcinoma, five achieved complete response (CR) (17%) and 13 achieved partial response (PR) (43%). Durations of response for patients with a CR and PR were 10.4 and 3.1 months, respectively. Median time to disease progression for all patients was 4.5 months and median survival was 9.1 months. Median survival times for all responders and for complete responders and partial responders were 12.5, 14.2, and 10 months, respectively. One additional patient with an adenocarcinoma failed to respond, while a second with an adenoid cystic carcinoma achieved a PR for 3.4 months. Toxicity was moderate: seven patients experienced Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group grade 3 mucositis, and 11 patients had grade 3-4 hematologic toxicity. There was one treatment-related death due to nephrotoxicity. This study supports other studies that show a relatively high degree of activity of cisplatin and continuous-infusion 5-FU in advanced head and neck cancer.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)461-464
Number of pages4
JournalCancer Treatment Reports
Volume70
Issue number4
StatePublished - 1986
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

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