Children's attachment representations: longitudinal relations to school behavior and academic competency in middle childhood and adolescence.

T. Jacobsen, V. Hofmann

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

A longitudinal study examined children's (N = 108) attachment representations in relation to behavior and academic competency at school during middle childhood and adolescence. Attachment representations were assessed from children's responses to a separation story at age 7 years. At ages 9, 12, and 15, teachers rated children on four dimensions of school behavior: attention-participation, extroversion, disruptive behavior, and insecurity about self. Children's grade point average (GPA) in school was also examined. Children's attachment representations (secure vs. insecure) did not predict either disruptive behavior or extroversion, but they were significantly linked to attention-participation, insecurity about self, and GPA, with secure representations being associated with more favorable outcomes. The study controlled for social class, gender, IQ, perspective-taking ability, and prior competency.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)703-710
Number of pages8
JournalDevelopmental psychology
Volume33
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1997
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Demography
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Life-span and Life-course Studies

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