Children's achievement moderates the effects of mothers' use of control and autonomy support

Florrie Fei Yin Ng, Gwen A. Kenney-Benson, Eva M. Pomerantz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Two studies investigated the effects of parents' control and autonomy support on low- and high-achieving children. In Study 1, mothers' (N = 110) involvement with children (7 to 10 years old) in the context of a challenging task was observed. During this interaction, mothers' control predicted diminished engagement and their autonomy support predicted enhanced performance for low-achieving children more than for high-achieving children. In Study 2, mothers' (N = 121) responses to children's (9 to 12 years old) failure were assessed with a daily checklist. Children's grades were obtained at this time and 6 months later. Mothers' controlling responses predicted decreased performance and their autonomy-supportive responses predicted increased performance over time for low achievers more than for high achievers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)764-780
Number of pages17
JournalChild development
Volume75
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2004

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

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