Chicago’s south side blues-scapes: Creeping commodification and complex human response

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

This chapter provides an analysis of a black-owned blues club on Chicago's South Side that is currently undergoing a transformation. How are elite patterns of consumption shaping the decisions of black blues clubs' owners? Located in a two-mile area that is in the core of South Side's black "ghetto," blues clubs are under pressure to "upscale"--to transform their clubs into a more marketable commodity that provides pleasurable experiences for elites. How do the owners of these clubs decide what kind of social milieu they will cultivate as they seek to "produce pleasure and identity-nourishment for themselves and others in the club"? Will they transform their club into "a new playground for reverie and spectatorship for white elites"?
Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationGeographies of Privilege
EditorsFrance Winddance Twine, Bradley Gardener
PublisherTaylor and Francis
Pages71-94
Number of pages24
ISBN (Print)9780203070833
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2013

Fingerprint

clubs
club
elite
social milieu
ghetto
commodity
experience

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Sciences(all)

Cite this

Wilson, D. (2013). Chicago’s south side blues-scapes: Creeping commodification and complex human response. In F. W. Twine, & B. Gardener (Eds.), Geographies of Privilege (pp. 71-94). Taylor and Francis. https://doi.org/10.4324/9780203070833-11

Chicago’s south side blues-scapes : Creeping commodification and complex human response. / Wilson, David.

Geographies of Privilege. ed. / France Winddance Twine; Bradley Gardener. Taylor and Francis, 2013. p. 71-94.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Wilson, D 2013, Chicago’s south side blues-scapes: Creeping commodification and complex human response. in FW Twine & B Gardener (eds), Geographies of Privilege. Taylor and Francis, pp. 71-94. https://doi.org/10.4324/9780203070833-11
Wilson D. Chicago’s south side blues-scapes: Creeping commodification and complex human response. In Twine FW, Gardener B, editors, Geographies of Privilege. Taylor and Francis. 2013. p. 71-94 https://doi.org/10.4324/9780203070833-11
Wilson, David. / Chicago’s south side blues-scapes : Creeping commodification and complex human response. Geographies of Privilege. editor / France Winddance Twine ; Bradley Gardener. Taylor and Francis, 2013. pp. 71-94
@inbook{9a10520b4c0540578583062b12b68f7b,
title = "Chicago’s south side blues-scapes: Creeping commodification and complex human response",
abstract = "This chapter provides an analysis of a black-owned blues club on Chicago's South Side that is currently undergoing a transformation. How are elite patterns of consumption shaping the decisions of black blues clubs' owners? Located in a two-mile area that is in the core of South Side's black {"}ghetto,{"} blues clubs are under pressure to {"}upscale{"}--to transform their clubs into a more marketable commodity that provides pleasurable experiences for elites. How do the owners of these clubs decide what kind of social milieu they will cultivate as they seek to {"}produce pleasure and identity-nourishment for themselves and others in the club{"}? Will they transform their club into {"}a new playground for reverie and spectatorship for white elites{"}?",
author = "David Wilson",
year = "2013",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.4324/9780203070833-11",
language = "English (US)",
isbn = "9780203070833",
pages = "71--94",
editor = "Twine, {France Winddance} and Bradley Gardener",
booktitle = "Geographies of Privilege",
publisher = "Taylor and Francis",

}

TY - CHAP

T1 - Chicago’s south side blues-scapes

T2 - Creeping commodification and complex human response

AU - Wilson, David

PY - 2013/1/1

Y1 - 2013/1/1

N2 - This chapter provides an analysis of a black-owned blues club on Chicago's South Side that is currently undergoing a transformation. How are elite patterns of consumption shaping the decisions of black blues clubs' owners? Located in a two-mile area that is in the core of South Side's black "ghetto," blues clubs are under pressure to "upscale"--to transform their clubs into a more marketable commodity that provides pleasurable experiences for elites. How do the owners of these clubs decide what kind of social milieu they will cultivate as they seek to "produce pleasure and identity-nourishment for themselves and others in the club"? Will they transform their club into "a new playground for reverie and spectatorship for white elites"?

AB - This chapter provides an analysis of a black-owned blues club on Chicago's South Side that is currently undergoing a transformation. How are elite patterns of consumption shaping the decisions of black blues clubs' owners? Located in a two-mile area that is in the core of South Side's black "ghetto," blues clubs are under pressure to "upscale"--to transform their clubs into a more marketable commodity that provides pleasurable experiences for elites. How do the owners of these clubs decide what kind of social milieu they will cultivate as they seek to "produce pleasure and identity-nourishment for themselves and others in the club"? Will they transform their club into "a new playground for reverie and spectatorship for white elites"?

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84899829681&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84899829681&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.4324/9780203070833-11

DO - 10.4324/9780203070833-11

M3 - Chapter

AN - SCOPUS:84899829681

SN - 9780203070833

SP - 71

EP - 94

BT - Geographies of Privilege

A2 - Twine, France Winddance

A2 - Gardener, Bradley

PB - Taylor and Francis

ER -