Characterizing the eardrum admittance: Comparisons of tympanometry and reflectance

Sarah Robinson, Suzanne Thompson, Jont B. Allen

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

The residual ear canal (REC) between the probe and tympanic membrane (TM) is a significant source of non-pathological variability for acoustic measurements made in the ear canal. Tympanometry and reflectance, which seek to characterize the middle ear based on the TM admittance, must account for unknown REC dimensions. In tympanometry, the REC volume and 226 Hz TM admittance are estimated by varying the canal static pressure. Using a reflectance parametrization developed by the authors, typical assumptions for removing the REC effect are extended, and methods to estimate the REC volume and TM admittance are presented and compared to tympanometry. Results of this method are shown for reflectance measurements of human ears with varying static middle ear pressures (MEPs). The data show that the 226 Hz TM compliance is non-zero at tympanometric pressure extremes, and that acoustic parameters of the middle ear have highly variable, nonlinear dependence on the MEP level.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationMechanics of Hearing
Subtitle of host publicationProtein to Perception - Proceedings of the 12th International Workshop on the Mechanics of Hearing
EditorsDavid P. Corey, K. Domenica Karavitaki
PublisherAmerican Institute of Physics Inc.
ISBN (Electronic)9780735413504
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 31 2015
Event12th International Workshop on the Mechanics of Hearing: Protein to Perception - Cape Sounio, Greece
Duration: Jun 23 2014Jun 29 2014

Publication series

NameAIP Conference Proceedings
Volume1703
ISSN (Print)0094-243X
ISSN (Electronic)1551-7616

Other

Other12th International Workshop on the Mechanics of Hearing: Protein to Perception
CountryGreece
CityCape Sounio
Period6/23/146/29/14

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physics and Astronomy(all)

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