Characterization of the in vitro activities of the P1 and helper component proteases of Soybean mosaic virus strain G2 and Tobacco vein mottling virus

Hyoun Sub Lim, Chan Yong Jang, Jiryun Nam, Meijia Li, Jin Sung Hong, Hanhong Bae, Ho Jong Ju, Hong Gi Kim, Richard E. Ford, Leslie L. Domier

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debate

Abstract

Potyviruses express their RNA genomes through the production of polyproteins that are processed in host cells by three virus-encoded proteases. Soybean plants produce large amounts of protease inhibitors during seed development and in response to wounding that could affect the activities of these proteases. The in vitro activities of two of the proteases of Soybean mosaic virus (SMV) and Tobacco vein mottling virus (TVMV) were compared in the rabbit reticulocyte lysate in vitro translation system using synthetic RNA transcripts. Transcripts produced from SMV and TVMV cDNAs that included the P1 and helper component-protease (HC-Pro) coding regions directed synthesis of protein products that were only partially processed. Unprocessed poly-proteins were not detected from transcripts that included all of the P1, HC-Pro, P3 and portions of the cylindrical inclusion protein coding regions of either virus. Addition of soybean trypsin inhibitor to in vitro translation reactions increased the accumulation of the unprocessed polyprotein from TVMV transcripts, but did not alter the patterns of proteins produced from SMV. These experiments suggest that SMV- and TVMV-encoded proteases are differentially sensitive to protease inhibitors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)197-201
Number of pages5
JournalPlant Pathology Journal
Volume28
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2012

Keywords

  • Helper-component protease
  • In vitro translation
  • P1 protease
  • Trypsin inhibitor

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agronomy and Crop Science

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