Changes in nonstructural carbohydrates in different parts of soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr.) plants during a light/dark cycle and in extended darkness

Phillip S. Kerr, Thomas W. Rufty, Steven C. Huber

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Diurnal patterns of nonstructurl carbohydrate (starch, sucrose, and hexose sugar) concentration were characterized in different parts (leaves, petioles, stems, and roots) of vegetative soybean (Glyciae max [L.] Meff.) plants. Pronounced changes in all carbohydrate pools were observed in all plant parts during the normal photosynthetic period; however, starch accumulation within leaves accounted for more than 80% of the nonstructural carbohydrate accumulated by the plant during the light period. Efficiency of utilization of starch and sucrose during the normal dark period differed among orpns, with leaves being most efficient in mobilizing starch reserves and roots being most efficient in utilizing sucrose reserves. The vast majority (about 85%) of the whole plant carbohydrate reserves present at the end of the photosynthetic period were otilzed during the normal dark period. Sink leaf expansion ceased in plants transferred to extended darkness and the cessation in leaf expansion corresponded with carbohydrate depletion in the subtending source leaf and the remainder of the plant. Collectively, the results indicated that under the conditions employed, leaves are the whole plant's primary source of carbon at night as well as during the day.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)576-581
Number of pages6
JournalPlant physiology
Volume78
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1985

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Darkness
Photoperiod
petioles
Soybeans
Glycine max
photoperiod
Starch
Carbohydrates
Plant Leaves
soybeans
carbohydrates
stems
Sucrose
leaves
starch
leaf development
scotophase
sucrose
Hexoses
Carbon

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Genetics
  • Plant Science

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Changes in nonstructural carbohydrates in different parts of soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr.) plants during a light/dark cycle and in extended darkness. / Kerr, Phillip S.; Rufty, Thomas W.; Huber, Steven C.

In: Plant physiology, Vol. 78, No. 3, 01.01.1985, p. 576-581.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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