Change blindness, Gibson, and the sensorimotor theory of vision

Brian J. Scholl, Daniel J. Simons

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debatepeer-review

Abstract

We suggest that the sensorimotor "theory" of vision is really an unstructured collection of separate ideas, and that much of the evidence cited in its favor at best supports only a subset of these ideas. As an example, we note that work on change blindness does not "vindicate" (or even speak to) much of the sensorimotor framework. Moreover, the ideas themselves are not always internally consistent. Finally, the proposed framework draws on ideas initially espoused by James Gibson, but does little to differentiate itself from those earlier views. For even part of this framework to become testable, it must specify which sources of evidence can support or contradict each of the component hypotheses.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1004-1005
Number of pages2
JournalBehavioral and Brain Sciences
Volume24
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2001
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Physiology
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

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