Cardiorespiratory fitness mediates the effects of aging on cerebral blood flow

Benjamin Zimmerman, Bradley P. Sutton, Kathy A. Low, Mark A. Fletcher, Chin Hong Tan, Nils Schneider-Garces, Yanfen Li, Cheng Ouyang, Edward L. Maclin, Gabriele Gratton, Monica Fabiani

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The brain's vasculature is likely to be subjected to the same age-related physiological and anatomical changes affecting the rest of the cardiovascular system. Since aerobic fitness is known to alleviate both cognitive and volumetric losses in the brain, it is important to investigate some of the possible mechanisms underlying these beneficial changes. Here we investigated the role that estimated cardiorespiratory fitness (eCRF) plays in determining the relationship between aging and cerebral blood flow (CBF) in a group of older adults (ages 55-85). Using arterial spin labeling to quantify CBF, we found that blood flow in the gray matter was positively correlated with eCRF and negatively correlated with age. Subsequent analyses revealed that eCRF fully mediated the effects of age on CBF in the gray matter, but not in the white matter. Additionally, regional measures of CBF were related to regional measures of brain volume. These findings provide evidence that age-related effects on cerebrovascular health and perfusion in older adults are largely influenced by their eCRF levels.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numberArticle 59
JournalFrontiers in Aging Neuroscience
Volume6
Issue numberAPR
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

Fingerprint

Cerebrovascular Circulation
Brain
Cardiovascular System
Perfusion
Cardiorespiratory Fitness
Health

Keywords

  • Aging
  • Arterial spin labeling
  • Cardiorespiratory fitness
  • Cerebral blood flow
  • Perfusion
  • Vascular health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Aging
  • Cognitive Neuroscience

Cite this

Cardiorespiratory fitness mediates the effects of aging on cerebral blood flow. / Zimmerman, Benjamin; Sutton, Bradley P.; Low, Kathy A.; Fletcher, Mark A.; Tan, Chin Hong; Schneider-Garces, Nils; Li, Yanfen; Ouyang, Cheng; Maclin, Edward L.; Gratton, Gabriele; Fabiani, Monica.

In: Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience, Vol. 6, No. APR, Article 59, 01.01.2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Zimmerman, B, Sutton, BP, Low, KA, Fletcher, MA, Tan, CH, Schneider-Garces, N, Li, Y, Ouyang, C, Maclin, EL, Gratton, G & Fabiani, M 2014, 'Cardiorespiratory fitness mediates the effects of aging on cerebral blood flow', Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience, vol. 6, no. APR, Article 59. https://doi.org/10.3389/fnagi.2014.00059
Zimmerman, Benjamin ; Sutton, Bradley P. ; Low, Kathy A. ; Fletcher, Mark A. ; Tan, Chin Hong ; Schneider-Garces, Nils ; Li, Yanfen ; Ouyang, Cheng ; Maclin, Edward L. ; Gratton, Gabriele ; Fabiani, Monica. / Cardiorespiratory fitness mediates the effects of aging on cerebral blood flow. In: Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience. 2014 ; Vol. 6, No. APR.
@article{cebe466c04af4b8ca6991b0d42cb02c3,
title = "Cardiorespiratory fitness mediates the effects of aging on cerebral blood flow",
abstract = "The brain's vasculature is likely to be subjected to the same age-related physiological and anatomical changes affecting the rest of the cardiovascular system. Since aerobic fitness is known to alleviate both cognitive and volumetric losses in the brain, it is important to investigate some of the possible mechanisms underlying these beneficial changes. Here we investigated the role that estimated cardiorespiratory fitness (eCRF) plays in determining the relationship between aging and cerebral blood flow (CBF) in a group of older adults (ages 55-85). Using arterial spin labeling to quantify CBF, we found that blood flow in the gray matter was positively correlated with eCRF and negatively correlated with age. Subsequent analyses revealed that eCRF fully mediated the effects of age on CBF in the gray matter, but not in the white matter. Additionally, regional measures of CBF were related to regional measures of brain volume. These findings provide evidence that age-related effects on cerebrovascular health and perfusion in older adults are largely influenced by their eCRF levels.",
keywords = "Aging, Arterial spin labeling, Cardiorespiratory fitness, Cerebral blood flow, Perfusion, Vascular health",
author = "Benjamin Zimmerman and Sutton, {Bradley P.} and Low, {Kathy A.} and Fletcher, {Mark A.} and Tan, {Chin Hong} and Nils Schneider-Garces and Yanfen Li and Cheng Ouyang and Maclin, {Edward L.} and Gabriele Gratton and Monica Fabiani",
year = "2014",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.3389/fnagi.2014.00059",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "6",
journal = "Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience",
issn = "1663-4365",
publisher = "Frontiers Research Foundation",
number = "APR",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Cardiorespiratory fitness mediates the effects of aging on cerebral blood flow

AU - Zimmerman, Benjamin

AU - Sutton, Bradley P.

AU - Low, Kathy A.

AU - Fletcher, Mark A.

AU - Tan, Chin Hong

AU - Schneider-Garces, Nils

AU - Li, Yanfen

AU - Ouyang, Cheng

AU - Maclin, Edward L.

AU - Gratton, Gabriele

AU - Fabiani, Monica

PY - 2014/1/1

Y1 - 2014/1/1

N2 - The brain's vasculature is likely to be subjected to the same age-related physiological and anatomical changes affecting the rest of the cardiovascular system. Since aerobic fitness is known to alleviate both cognitive and volumetric losses in the brain, it is important to investigate some of the possible mechanisms underlying these beneficial changes. Here we investigated the role that estimated cardiorespiratory fitness (eCRF) plays in determining the relationship between aging and cerebral blood flow (CBF) in a group of older adults (ages 55-85). Using arterial spin labeling to quantify CBF, we found that blood flow in the gray matter was positively correlated with eCRF and negatively correlated with age. Subsequent analyses revealed that eCRF fully mediated the effects of age on CBF in the gray matter, but not in the white matter. Additionally, regional measures of CBF were related to regional measures of brain volume. These findings provide evidence that age-related effects on cerebrovascular health and perfusion in older adults are largely influenced by their eCRF levels.

AB - The brain's vasculature is likely to be subjected to the same age-related physiological and anatomical changes affecting the rest of the cardiovascular system. Since aerobic fitness is known to alleviate both cognitive and volumetric losses in the brain, it is important to investigate some of the possible mechanisms underlying these beneficial changes. Here we investigated the role that estimated cardiorespiratory fitness (eCRF) plays in determining the relationship between aging and cerebral blood flow (CBF) in a group of older adults (ages 55-85). Using arterial spin labeling to quantify CBF, we found that blood flow in the gray matter was positively correlated with eCRF and negatively correlated with age. Subsequent analyses revealed that eCRF fully mediated the effects of age on CBF in the gray matter, but not in the white matter. Additionally, regional measures of CBF were related to regional measures of brain volume. These findings provide evidence that age-related effects on cerebrovascular health and perfusion in older adults are largely influenced by their eCRF levels.

KW - Aging

KW - Arterial spin labeling

KW - Cardiorespiratory fitness

KW - Cerebral blood flow

KW - Perfusion

KW - Vascular health

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84901371548&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84901371548&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.3389/fnagi.2014.00059

DO - 10.3389/fnagi.2014.00059

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:84901371548

VL - 6

JO - Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience

JF - Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience

SN - 1663-4365

IS - APR

M1 - Article 59

ER -