Capture and recover dissolved phosphorous from aqueous solutions by a designer biochar: Mechanism and performance insights

Simin Yang, Sarmila Katuwal, Wei Zheng, Brajendra Sharma, Richard Cooke

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Excessive phosphorus (P) in marine and freshwater systems has been identified as a primary perpetrator for the harmful and nuisance algal blooms. In this study, a novel designer biochar was produced from sawdust biomass treated with lime sludge prior to pyrolysis. The adsorption of dissolved P on the designer biochar was comprehensively evaluated under different experimental conditions. It revealed that the removal of dissolved P by the designer biochar was more efficient than unmodified biochar, lime sludge, and their post-combination, suggesting that the pretreatment of biomass with lime sludge for the designer biochar production has a significantly synergic effect on enhancing P removal. Post-adsorption characterization and mathematical modeling analyses indicated that the adsorption of dissolved P on the designer biochar could be controlled by multiple mechanisms including physical and chemical adsorption. The precipitation reaction between P anions and metal ions on the surface of the designer biochar was identified as a predominant mechanism. The X-ray diffraction showed that the precipitation reaction generated a series of P fertilizer forms depositing onto the designer biochar. In addition, batch adsorption experiments showed that both initial solution pH and coexisting anions had a lesser effect on the P removal by the designer biochar. This study proposed that the designer biochar could be a promising sorbent to remove dissolved P, and the nutrient-captured biochar could be used as a fertilizer to recover nutrients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number129717
JournalChemosphere
Volume274
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2021

Keywords

  • Adsorption
  • Capture
  • Designer biochar
  • Dissolved phosphorous
  • Lime sludge
  • Recover

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Engineering
  • Environmental Chemistry
  • Chemistry(all)
  • Pollution
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

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