Abstract

Single-channel fluorescence detectors provide extremely low limits of detection for analytes separated by capillary electrophoresis (CE), but little structural or diagnostic information. In wavelength-resolved fluorescence detection, complete fluorescence emission spectra are acquired for every analyte separated by CE. The fluorescence spectral information has been used for DNA sequencing and to identify the tyrosine and tryptophan content of peptides. In addition, a variety of diagnostic uses for the fluorescence information exist, including monitoring excitation source stability and the pH, organic content and impurities in the running buffer. The popularity of spectrally resolved fluorescence detection in CE is expected to increase just as diode-array detection has become relatively common for ultraviolet-visible absorbance.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAnalyst
Volume121
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 1996

Fingerprint

Capillary electrophoresis
Capillary Electrophoresis
electrokinesis
fluorescence
Fluorescence
wavelength
Wavelength
DNA Sequence Analysis
absorbance
Tryptophan
peptide
Peptides
Tyrosine
Limit of Detection
detection
Buffers
Diodes
DNA
Impurities
Detectors

Keywords

  • Capillary electrophoresis
  • Laser-induced fluorescence detection
  • Microseparations
  • Review

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Analytical Chemistry

Cite this

Capillary electrophoresis with wavelength-resolved fluorescence detection. / Timperman, Aaron Thomas; Sweedler, Jonathan V.

In: Analyst, Vol. 121, No. 5, 01.05.1996.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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