Can first graders learn an advanced problem-solving skill?

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

A training procedure employing programed-instruction techniques was used to teach high-IQ 1st graders to solve problems by varying each factor in succession while holding all other factors constant. On training tasks presented again later to test retention, the trained group (N = 30) solved more problems (p < .01) with fewer unnecessary trials (p < .01) than the control group (N = 30). The trained group also solved more transfer problems (p < .01) and solved these more efficiently (p < .01) than did the control group. The results indicate, contrary to prominent developmental theories, that children can acquire, retain, and transfer rather complex and "advanced" problem-solving skills when presented with suitable training. (20 ref.) (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2006 APA, all rights reserved).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)283-294
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Educational Psychology
Volume56
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 1965
Externally publishedYes

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Programmed Instruction
Control Groups
Group
instruction
Transfer (Psychology)
Retention (Psychology)

Keywords

  • CHILDHOOD/LEARNING IN, PROGRAMED INSTRUCTION &
  • PROBLEM SOLVING IN FIRST GRADE
  • PROBLEM SOLVING, SKILL &
  • PROGRAMED INSTRUCTION IN 1ST GRADE
  • PROGRAMED INSTRUCTION, PROBLEM SOLVING SKILL IN 1ST GRADE

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

Can first graders learn an advanced problem-solving skill? / Anderson, Richard C.

In: Journal of Educational Psychology, Vol. 56, No. 6, 01.12.1965, p. 283-294.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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