Can communities and academia work together on public health research? Evaluation results from a community-based participatory research partnership in Detroit

P. M. Lantz, E. Viruell-Fuentes, B. A. Israel, D. Softley, R. Guzman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This article reports the results of a formative evaluation of the first 4 years of the Detroit Community-Academic Urban Research Center (URC), a community-based participatory research partnership that was founded in 1995 with core funding from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Several organizations are members of this partnership, including a university, six community-based organizations, a city health department, a health care system, and CDC. The Detroit URC is a strong partnership that has accomplished many of its goals, including the receipt of over $11 million in funding for 12 community-based participatory research projects during its initial 4 years. Detroit URC Board members identified a number of facilitating factors for their growth and achievements, such, as (1) developing a sound infra-structure and set of processes for making decisions and working together, (2) building trust among partners, (3) garnering committed and active leadership from community partners, and (4) receiving support from CDC. Board members also identified a number of ongoing challenges, including organizational constraints, time pressures, and balancing community interests in interventions and academic research needs. Overall, the Detroit URC represents a partnership approach to identifying community health concerns and implementing potential solutions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)495-507
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Urban Health
Volume78
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2001

Keywords

  • Coalitions
  • Community-based participatory research
  • Evaluation
  • Intervention research
  • Participatory action research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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