Campania in the Flavian Poetic Imagination

Antony Augoustakis (Editor), R. Joy Littlewood (Editor)

Research output: Book/ReportBook

Abstract

The region of Campania with its fertility and volcanic landscape exercised great influence over the Roman cultural imagination. A hub of activity outside the city of Rome, the Bay of Naples was a place of otium, leisure and quiet, repose and literary productivity, and yet also a place of danger: the looming Vesuvius inspired both fear and awe in the region's inhabitants, while the Phlegraean Fields evoked the story of the gigantomachy and sulphurous lakes invited entry to the Underworld. For Flavian writers in particular, Campania became a locus for literary activity and geographical disaster when in 79 CE, the eruption of the volcano annihilated a great expanse of the region, burying under a mass of ash and lava the surrounding cities of Pompeii, Herculaneum, and Stabiae. In the aftermath of such tragedy the writers examined in this volume - Martial, Silius Italicus, Statius, and Valerius Flaccus - continued to live, work, and write about Campania, which emerges from their work as an alluring region held in the balance of luxury and peril.
LanguageEnglish (US)
PublisherOxford University Press
Number of pages352
ISBN (Print)9780198807742
StateAccepted/In press - Mar 28 2019

Fingerprint

Poetics
Writer
Herculaneum
Disaster
Fertility
Perils
Ash
Danger
Naples
Leisure
Productivity
Tragedy
Volcano
Rome
Underworld
Luxury
Valerius Flaccus
Pompeii
Locus

Cite this

Augoustakis, A., & Littlewood, R. J. (Eds.) (Accepted/In press). Campania in the Flavian Poetic Imagination. Oxford University Press.

Campania in the Flavian Poetic Imagination. / Augoustakis, Antony (Editor); Littlewood, R. Joy (Editor).

Oxford University Press, 2019. 352 p.

Research output: Book/ReportBook

Augoustakis, A & Littlewood, RJ (eds) 2019, Campania in the Flavian Poetic Imagination. Oxford University Press.
Augoustakis A, (ed.), Littlewood RJ, (ed.). Campania in the Flavian Poetic Imagination. Oxford University Press, 2019. 352 p.
Augoustakis, Antony (Editor) ; Littlewood, R. Joy (Editor). / Campania in the Flavian Poetic Imagination. Oxford University Press, 2019. 352 p.
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