Calling behavior of the cerambycid beetle Neoclytus acuminatus acuminatus (F.)

Emerson S. Lacey, Ann M. Ray, Lawrence M. Hanks

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Males of the cerambycid beetle Neoclytus acuminatus acuminatus (F.) assume a body posture, never displayed by females, that appears to be associated with release of an aggregation pheromone: they periodically stop walking and fully extend their front legs, elevating their head and thorax above the substrate. In this article, we demonstrate that this body posture, the "pushup stance," coincides with release of pheromone and that it serves to elevate pheromone glands above the substrate. We also use a pheromone proxy system (sublimation of naphthalene) to demonstrate that the pushup stance increases rates of pheromone dissemination. The pushup stance provides a convenient indictor for studying the role of pheromones in reproductive behavior and facilitating collection of pheromone in the laboratory.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)117-128
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Insect Behavior
Volume20
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2007

Keywords

  • Longhorned beetle
  • Pheromone
  • Reproductive behavior
  • Semiochemical

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Insect Science

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