Calculus Expertise and Strategy Use when Comparing Multiple Representations

Julie L. Booth, Briana L. Chang, Jennifer G. Cromley, Thomas F. Shipley, Theodore Wills

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Expertise affords individuals a variety of advantages for learning and for problem solving, including competing advantages such as using automatic strategies vs. using sophisticated strategies. In the present study, high school students with varying levels of calculus expertise completed measures of conceptual understanding and skill with external representations before a task in which they were asked to coordinate between multiple representations (CMR) and determine whether they represented the same mathematical function. Strategy use during the CMR task was coded based on think-aloud data. Results indicate that students with more expertise tended to use automatic strategies when completing the task, and, surprisingly, used fewer sophisticated strategies than more novice peers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 36th Annual Meeting of the Cognitive Science Society, CogSci 2014
PublisherThe Cognitive Science Society
Pages1935-1939
Number of pages5
ISBN (Electronic)9780991196708
StatePublished - 2014
Externally publishedYes
Event36th Annual Meeting of the Cognitive Science Society, CogSci 2014 - Quebec City, Canada
Duration: Jul 23 2014Jul 26 2014

Publication series

NameProceedings of the 36th Annual Meeting of the Cognitive Science Society, CogSci 2014

Conference

Conference36th Annual Meeting of the Cognitive Science Society, CogSci 2014
Country/TerritoryCanada
CityQuebec City
Period7/23/147/26/14

Keywords

  • coordinating multiple representations
  • expertise
  • mathematics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Artificial Intelligence
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Human-Computer Interaction
  • Cognitive Neuroscience

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