Bullying and Middle School Students With and Without Specific Learning Disabilities: An Examination of Social-Ecological Predictors

Chad Allen Rose, Dorothy L Espelage, Lisa E. Monda-Amaya, Karrie A. Shogren, Steven R. Aragon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The current study investigated demographic variables, sense of belonging, and social supports as predictors for involvement in bullying for students with specific learning disabilities (SLD) and students without disabilities. Although these student groups are characteristically different, results suggested involvement in bullying was invariant. However, gender, race, grade point average, and participation in extracurricular activities emerged as significant predictors for involvement in the bullying dynamic. In addition, increased peer social support was found to be the most significant predictor of decreased bullying, victimization, fighting, and anger for both students with SLD and students without disabilities. Educational implications include the suggestion that schools adopt multitiered antibullying programs that foster increased social supports and peer acceptance and incorporate targeted interventions for at-risk subpopulations of students.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)239-254
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Learning Disabilities
Volume48
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 9 2015
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • behavior issues
  • peer relations
  • social-emotional

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Education
  • General Health Professions

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