Building trust: Supporting vulnerability for doing science in school

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Science education’s emphasis on supporting students’ participation in science knowledge-building practices, often through talk and collaboration, have become increasingly important goals for learning. But this emphasis creates both social and epistemic risks for students: the process of building knowledge requires continually identifying and wrestling with uncertainty, and building knowledge collectively requires making that uncertainty public. In this study, I investigate how a classroom community shifted to become a place where students regularly participated in risky science knowledge-building. I theorize that this shift occurred through a process of trust-building, and utilize this case to further elucidate the phenomenon of trust-building in the context of science learning.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication14th International Conference of the Learning Sciences
Subtitle of host publicationThe Interdisciplinarity of the Learning Sciences, ICLS 2020 - Conference Proceedings
EditorsMelissa Gresalfi, Ilana Seidel Horn
PublisherInternational Society of the Learning Sciences (ISLS)
Pages270-277
Number of pages8
ISBN (Electronic)9781732467255
StatePublished - 2020
Event14th International Conference of the Learning Sciences: The Interdisciplinarity of the Learning Sciences, ICLS 2020 - Nashville, United States
Duration: Jun 19 2020Jun 23 2020

Publication series

NameComputer-Supported Collaborative Learning Conference, CSCL
Volume1
ISSN (Print)1573-4552

Conference

Conference14th International Conference of the Learning Sciences: The Interdisciplinarity of the Learning Sciences, ICLS 2020
Country/TerritoryUnited States
CityNashville
Period6/19/206/23/20

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Human-Computer Interaction
  • Education

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