Brain imaging, cognitive processes, and brain networks

Brian D. Gonsalves, Neal J. Cohen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The recent, rapid expansion of the application of neuroimaging techniques to a broad variety of questions about the structure and function of mind and brain has led to much necessary and often critical introspection about what these techniques can actually tell us about cognitive processes. In this article, we attempt to place neuroimaging within the broader context of the cognitive neuroscience approach, which emphasizes the benefits of converging methodologies for understanding cognition and how it is supported by the functioning of the brain. Our arguments for what neuroimaging has to offer are supported by two specific examples from research on memory that, we believe, show how neuroimaging data have provided unique insights not only into brain organization, but also into the organization of the mind.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)744-752
Number of pages9
JournalPerspectives on Psychological Science
Volume5
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2010

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Neuroimaging
Brain
Cognition
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Keywords

  • Cognitive neuroscience
  • Memory
  • Neuroimaging
  • Parietal cortex
  • Prefrontal cortex

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Brain imaging, cognitive processes, and brain networks. / Gonsalves, Brian D.; Cohen, Neal J.

In: Perspectives on Psychological Science, Vol. 5, No. 6, 01.11.2010, p. 744-752.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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