Bootstrap assessment of the reliability of maxima in surface maps of brain activity of individual subjects derived with electrophysiological and optical methods

Monica Fabiani, Gabriele Gratton, Paul M. Corballis, Jeff Cheng, David Friedman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Surface maps of brain activity can be obtained with electrophysiological and optical recordings. However, there are no established methods for determining the reliability of maps of brain activity across subject groups or across tasks within the same subject. In this paper, we use bootstrapping to establish the reliability of the locations of maxima in maps of surface brain activity of individual subjects obtained with ERP and optical (EROS) recordings and report sample analyses for two data sets. Bootstrapping is a nonparametric method for estimating statistical accuracy from the data in a single sample. The distribution of the statistic of interest is estimated by constructing "bootstrap samples" from a pool of all available cases (with replacement). Many "bootstrap replications" are obtained by calculating the statistic of interest for each sample. In the case of brain activity, many (e.g., 10,000) amplitude distributions can be derived from the data of an individual subject. Frequency counts are then computed for each recording location to establish how many times that location corresponds to a maximum. The value obtained in this fashion represents an estimate of the reliability of the observation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)78-86
Number of pages9
JournalBehavior Research Methods, Instruments, and Computers
Volume30
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1998
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Psychology (miscellaneous)
  • Psychology(all)

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