Bodies in Contact: Rethinking Colonial Encounters in World History

Tony Ballantyne (Editor), Antoinette M Burton (Editor)

Research output: Book/ReportBook

Abstract

From portrayals of African women’s bodies in early modern European travel accounts to the relation between celibacy and Indian nationalism to the fate of the Korean “comfort women” forced into prostitution by the occupying Japanese army during the Second World War, the essays collected in Bodies in Contact demonstrate how a focus on the body as a site of cultural encounter provides essential insights into world history. Together these essays reveal the “body as contact zone” as a powerful analytic rubric for interpreting the mechanisms and legacies of colonialism and illuminating how attention to gender alters understandings of world history. Rather than privileging the operations of the Foreign Office or gentlemanly capitalists, these historical studies render the home, the street, the school, the club, and the marketplace visible as sites of imperial ideologies.

Bodies in Contact brings together important scholarship on colonial gender studies gathered from journals around the world. Breaking with approaches to world history as the history of “the West and the rest,” the contributors offer a panoramic perspective. They examine aspects of imperial regimes including the Ottoman, Mughal, Soviet, British, Han, and Spanish, over a span of six hundred years—from the fifteenth century through the mid-twentieth. Discussing subjects as diverse as slavery and travel, ecclesiastical colonialism and military occupation, marriage and property, nationalism and football, immigration and temperance, Bodies in Contact puts women, gender, and sexuality at the center of the “master narratives” of imperialism and world history.
Original languageEnglish (US)
Place of PublicationDurham, NC
PublisherDuke University Press
Number of pages464
ISBN (Print)978-0-8223-3455-2, 978-0-8223-3467-5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2005

Fingerprint

Colonies
World History
Colonialism
Mughal
Immigration
Army
Gender Studies
Portrayal
Nationalism
Indian Nationalism
Imperial Ideology
Render
Football
Marriage
History
Fate
Travel Account
Visible
Prostitution
Slavery

Cite this

Bodies in Contact : Rethinking Colonial Encounters in World History. / Ballantyne, Tony (Editor); Burton, Antoinette M (Editor).

Durham, NC : Duke University Press, 2005. 464 p.

Research output: Book/ReportBook

Ballantyne, Tony (Editor) ; Burton, Antoinette M (Editor). / Bodies in Contact : Rethinking Colonial Encounters in World History. Durham, NC : Duke University Press, 2005. 464 p.
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