Black Silicon/Elastomer Composite Surface with Switchable Wettability and Adhesion between Lotus and Rose Petal Effects by Mechanical Strain

Jun Kyu Park, Zining Yang, Seok Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Although many recent studies demonstrate surfaces with switchable wettability under various external stimuli, a deliberate effort to self-propel liquid droplets utilizing a surface wetting mode switch between slippery lotus and adhesive rose petal states via a mechanical strain has not been made yet, which would otherwise further benefit microfluidic applications. In this work, we present a black silicon/elastomer (bSi/elastomer) composite surface which shows switchable wettability and adhesion across the two wetting modes by mechanical stretching. The composite surface is composed of a scale-like nanostructured silicon platelet array that covers an elastomer surface. The gap between the neighboring silicon platelets is reversibly changeable as a function of a mechanical strain, leading to the transition between the two wetting modes. Moreover, the composite surface is highly flexible although its wetting properties primarily originate from superhydrophobic bSi platelets. Different wetting characteristics of the composite surface in various mechanical strains are studied, and droplet manipulation such as droplet self-propulsion and pick-and-place using the composite surface is demonstrated, which highlights its potentials for microfluidic applications.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)33333-33340
Number of pages8
JournalACS Applied Materials and Interfaces
Volume9
Issue number38
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 27 2017

Keywords

  • droplet manipulation
  • lotus leaf
  • rose petal
  • superhydrophobic
  • switchable wettability

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General Materials Science

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