Birth of clones of the world's first cloned dog

Min Jung Kim, Hyun Ju Oh, Geon A. Kim, Erif Maha Nugraha Setyawan, Yoo Bin Choi, Seok Hee Lee, Simon M. Petersen-Jones, Che Myong J. Ko, Byeong Chun Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Animal cloning has gained popularity as a method to produce genetically identical animals or superior animals for research or industrial uses. However, the long-standing question of whether a cloned animal undergoes an accelerated aging process is yet to be answered. As a step towards answering this question, we compared longevity and health of Snuppy, the world's first cloned dog, and its somatic cell donor, Tai, a male Afghan hound. Briefly, both Snuppy and Tai were generally healthy until both developed cancer to which they succumbed at the ages of 10 and 12 years, respectively. The longevity of both the donor and the cloned dog was close to the median lifespan of Afghan hounds which is reported to be 11.9 years. Here, we report creation of 4 clones using adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells from Snuppy as donor cells. Clinical and molecular follow-up of these reclones over their lives will provide us with a unique opportunity to study the health and longevity of cloned animals compared with their cell donors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number15235
JournalScientific reports
Volume7
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2017

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Clone Cells
Parturition
Dogs
Mesenchymal Stromal Cells
Organism Cloning
Health
Neoplasms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

Cite this

Kim, M. J., Oh, H. J., Kim, G. A., Setyawan, E. M. N., Choi, Y. B., Lee, S. H., ... Lee, B. C. (2017). Birth of clones of the world's first cloned dog. Scientific reports, 7(1), [15235]. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-017-15328-2

Birth of clones of the world's first cloned dog. / Kim, Min Jung; Oh, Hyun Ju; Kim, Geon A.; Setyawan, Erif Maha Nugraha; Choi, Yoo Bin; Lee, Seok Hee; Petersen-Jones, Simon M.; Ko, Che Myong J.; Lee, Byeong Chun.

In: Scientific reports, Vol. 7, No. 1, 15235, 01.12.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kim, MJ, Oh, HJ, Kim, GA, Setyawan, EMN, Choi, YB, Lee, SH, Petersen-Jones, SM, Ko, CMJ & Lee, BC 2017, 'Birth of clones of the world's first cloned dog', Scientific reports, vol. 7, no. 1, 15235. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-017-15328-2
Kim MJ, Oh HJ, Kim GA, Setyawan EMN, Choi YB, Lee SH et al. Birth of clones of the world's first cloned dog. Scientific reports. 2017 Dec 1;7(1). 15235. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-017-15328-2
Kim, Min Jung ; Oh, Hyun Ju ; Kim, Geon A. ; Setyawan, Erif Maha Nugraha ; Choi, Yoo Bin ; Lee, Seok Hee ; Petersen-Jones, Simon M. ; Ko, Che Myong J. ; Lee, Byeong Chun. / Birth of clones of the world's first cloned dog. In: Scientific reports. 2017 ; Vol. 7, No. 1.
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