Becoming syntactic

Franklin Chang, Gary S. Dell, Kathryn Bock

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Psyoholinguistic research has shown that the influence of abstract syntactic knowledge on performance is shaped by particular sentences that have been experienced. To explore this idea, the authors applied a connectionist model of sentence production to the development and use of abstract syntax. The model makes use of (a) error-based learning to acquire and adapt sequencing mechanisms and (b) meaning-form mappings to derive syntactic representations. The model is able to account for most of what is known about structural priming in adult speakers, as well as key findings in preferential looking and elicited production studies of language acquisition. The model suggests how abstract knowledge and concrete experience are balanced in the development and use of syntax.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)234-272
Number of pages39
JournalPsychological review
Volume113
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2006

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Neural Networks (Computer)
Language
Learning
Research

Keywords

  • Connectionist models
  • Sentence production
  • Syntax acquisition

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Becoming syntactic. / Chang, Franklin; Dell, Gary S.; Bock, Kathryn.

In: Psychological review, Vol. 113, No. 2, 01.04.2006, p. 234-272.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Chang, F, Dell, GS & Bock, K 2006, 'Becoming syntactic', Psychological review, vol. 113, no. 2, pp. 234-272. https://doi.org/10.1037/0033-295X.113.2.234
Chang, Franklin ; Dell, Gary S. ; Bock, Kathryn. / Becoming syntactic. In: Psychological review. 2006 ; Vol. 113, No. 2. pp. 234-272.
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