Automatic estimation of intelligibility measure for consonants in speech

Ali Abavisani, Mark Hasegawa-Johnson

Research output: Contribution to journalConference articlepeer-review

Abstract

In this article, we provide a model to estimate a real-valued measure of the intelligibility of individual speech segments. We trained regression models based on Convolutional Neural Networks (CNN) for stop consonants /p,t,k,b,d,g/ associated with vowel /A/, to estimate the corresponding Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR) at which the Consonant-Vowel (CV) sound becomes intelligible for Normal Hearing (NH) ears. The intelligibility measure for each sound is called SNR90, and is defined to be the SNR level at which human participants are able to recognize the consonant at least 90% correctly, on average, as determined in prior experiments with NH subjects. Performance of the CNN is compared to a baseline prediction based on automatic speech recognition (ASR), specifically, a constant offset subtracted from the SNR at which the ASR becomes capable of correctly labeling the consonant. Compared to baseline, our models were able to accurately estimate the SNR90 intelligibility measure with less than 2 [dB2] Mean Squared Error (MSE) on average, while the baseline ASR-defined measure computes SNR90 with a variance of 5.2 to 26.6 [dB2], depending on the consonant.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1161-1165
Number of pages5
JournalProceedings of the Annual Conference of the International Speech Communication Association, INTERSPEECH
Volume2020-October
DOIs
StatePublished - 2020
Event21st Annual Conference of the International Speech Communication Association, INTERSPEECH 2020 - Shanghai, China
Duration: Oct 25 2020Oct 29 2020

Keywords

  • Human speech recognition
  • Objective intelligibility measures
  • Speech perception in noise

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Language and Linguistics
  • Human-Computer Interaction
  • Signal Processing
  • Software
  • Modeling and Simulation

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