Authoritative parenting and drug-prevention practices: Implications for antidrug ads for parents

Michael T. Stephenson, Brian L. Quick, Joshua Atkinson, David A. Tschida

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This research employed the theory of reasoned action to investigate the role of authoritative parenting in 3 drug-prevention behaviors: (a) parental monitoring, (b) parent-child discussions, and (c) awareness of the child's environment. A phone survey of 158 parents of adolescents in 7th, 9th, and 11th grades revealed that authoritative parenting was correlated with parenting practices that reduce the likelihood of adolescent drug use, including discussing family rules about drugs, discussing strategies to avoid drugs, discussing those in trouble with drugs, parental monitoring, knowing the child's plans for the coming day, and personally knowing the child's friends well. Additionally, authoritative parenting moderated the attitude-behavioral intention relation for parental monitoring and awareness of the child's environment, with the weakest relation detected for low-authoritative parents. The utility of these findings in helping design and target antidrug messages for parents more effectively is discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)301-321
Number of pages21
JournalHealth communication
Volume17
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2005
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Communication

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