Attraction of cerambycid beetles to their aggregation-sex pheromones is influenced by volatiles from host plants of their larvae

J. C.H. Wong, Y. Zou, J. G. Millar, L. M. Hanks

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Here, we describe a field experiment that tested for attraction of cerambycid beetles to odors from angiosperm hosts, and whether plant volatiles also serve to enhance attraction of beetles to their aggregation-sex pheromones. Traps were baited with a blend of synthesized chemicals that are common pheromone components of species in the subfamilies Cerambycinae and Lamiinae. The source of plant volatiles was chipped wood from trees of three angiosperm species, as well as from one nonhost, gymnosperm species. Bioassays were conducted in wooded areas of east-central Illinois. Traps were baited with the pheromone blend alone, the blend+wood chips from one tree species, wood chips alone, or a solvent control lure. Seven species of cerambycids were significantly attracted to the pheromone blend, with or without wood chips. In two cases, wood chips from angiosperms appeared to enhance attraction to pheromones, whereas they inhibited attraction in another three cases. Pine chips did not strongly influence attraction of any species. Overall, our results suggest that host plant volatiles from wood chips may improve trap catch with synthesized pheromones for some cerambycid species, but the effect is not general, necessitating case-by-case testing to determine how individual target species are affected.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)649-653
Number of pages5
JournalEnvironmental entomology
Volume46
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2017

Keywords

  • Cerambycidae
  • Chemical ecology
  • Longhorned beetle
  • Semiochemical

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Ecology
  • Insect Science

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