Atmospheric motion systems that influence the redistribution and accumulation of insects on the beaches of the great lakes in North America

Scott A. Isard, David A Kristovich, Stuart H. Gage, Carl J. Jones, Neil F. Laird

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

Abstract

This paper presents a strategy for obtaining information and evaluating hypotheses about atmospheric circulation patterns in the Great Lakes region of central North America and their role in insect transport. Within this region, stable flies (Diptera: Mucidae Stomoxys calcitrans (L.)), lady bird beetles (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae), and western corn rootworm beetles (Coleoptera: Crysomelidae Diabrotica virgifera virgifera, LeConte) accumulate at coastlines in large enough numbers to become important nuisance pests. We hypothesize that meteorological systems operating at both large and local scales interact with physiological and behavioral characteristics of these biota to cause accumulation of insects on shorelines. We postulate that midlatitude cyclones and their attendant atmospheric fronts are responsible for assisting the transport of many insects into coastal regions. Daytime differential radiative heating of land and water surfaces within coastal landscapes frequently causes lake breezes which provide a mechanism to explain the accumulation of insects on shorelines of large water bodies. The paper provides an example of an aerobiology project that focuses on multiple biological and meteorological systems and draws together scientists from a wide variety of disciplines and institutions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)275-291
Number of pages17
JournalAerobiologia
Volume17
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2001

Keywords

  • Atmospheric motion systems
  • Insect transport
  • Lake breeze

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology
  • Plant Science

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