Associations between Positive Parenting Practices and Child Externalizing Behavior in Underserved Latino Immigrant Families

Kendal Holtrop, Sharde McNeil Smith, Jenna C. Scott

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This study examined whether five specific parenting practices (i.e., monitoring, discipline, skill encouragement, problem solving, and positive involvement) were associated with reduced child externalizing behaviors among a sample of Latino immigrant families. It utilized baseline data from 83 Latino couples with children participating in a larger randomized controlled trial of a culturally adapted parenting intervention. Results reveal that monitoring, discipline, skill encouragement, and problem solving each made independent contributions to the prediction of child externalizing behavior, although not all in the expected direction. Further analyses examining mothers and fathers separately suggest that mother-reported monitoring and father-reported discipline practices uniquely contributed to these findings. These results may have important implications for prevention and clinical intervention efforts with Latino immigrant families, including the cultural adaptation and implementation of parenting interventions with this underserved population.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)359-375
Number of pages17
JournalFamily Process
Volume54
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2015

Keywords

  • Child Externalizing Behavior
  • Latino Families
  • Parenting
  • Parenting Practices

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

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