Associations between adult attachment style, emotion regulation, and preschool children's food consumption

Kelly K. Bost, Angela R. Wiley, Barbara Fiese, Amber Hammons, Brent Mcbride, Kristin Harrison, Sharon Donovan, Diana Grigsby-Toussaint, Juhee Kim, Janet Liechty, Margarita Teran-Garcia

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:: The goal of this study was to test 3 serial mediation models of how caregiver adult attachment style influences children's food consumption through its influence on emotion regulation. Three mediators that have been shown to increase the risk for pediatric obesity and that are likely to be influenced by negative emotion regulation strategies in everyday family interactions were chosen: (1) caregiver feeding practices (2) family mealtime routines, and (3) child television (TV) viewing. METHOD:: A total of 497 primary caregivers of 2.5- to 3.5-year-old children reported on their own attachment style, typical responses to their children's negative affect, feeding styles, mealtime and TV viewing routines, and their children's consumption of healthful and unhealthful foods. RESULTS:: Insecure mothers were more likely to use punishing or dismissing responses to their children's negative affect, and negative emotion regulation predicted the increased use of emotion-related feeding styles and fewer mealtime routines. These variables, in turn, were found to predict children's unhealthful food consumption, documenting serial mediational influences. With respect to TV viewing, caregiver insecurity influenced child food consumption indirectly through its direct effect on child TV viewing. CONCLUSION:: Taken together, these data suggest that insecure attachment may put parents at a risk for using negative emotion regulation strategies in response to their children's distress, which may also have important implications for the interpersonal environment surrounding food and the development of children's early eating behaviors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)50-61
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics
Volume35
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2014

Fingerprint

Preschool Children
Emotions
Food
Television
Caregivers
Meals
Family Practice
Pediatric Obesity
Feeding Behavior
Child Development
Parents
Mothers

Keywords

  • adult attachment style
  • emotion regulation
  • pediatric obesity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Associations between adult attachment style, emotion regulation, and preschool children's food consumption. / Bost, Kelly K.; Wiley, Angela R.; Fiese, Barbara; Hammons, Amber; Mcbride, Brent; Harrison, Kristin; Donovan, Sharon; Grigsby-Toussaint, Diana; Kim, Juhee; Liechty, Janet; Teran-Garcia, Margarita.

In: Journal of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics, Vol. 35, No. 1, 01.2014, p. 50-61.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{d712465e6e26456b9bfaaca79fe11db4,
title = "Associations between adult attachment style, emotion regulation, and preschool children's food consumption",
abstract = "OBJECTIVE:: The goal of this study was to test 3 serial mediation models of how caregiver adult attachment style influences children's food consumption through its influence on emotion regulation. Three mediators that have been shown to increase the risk for pediatric obesity and that are likely to be influenced by negative emotion regulation strategies in everyday family interactions were chosen: (1) caregiver feeding practices (2) family mealtime routines, and (3) child television (TV) viewing. METHOD:: A total of 497 primary caregivers of 2.5- to 3.5-year-old children reported on their own attachment style, typical responses to their children's negative affect, feeding styles, mealtime and TV viewing routines, and their children's consumption of healthful and unhealthful foods. RESULTS:: Insecure mothers were more likely to use punishing or dismissing responses to their children's negative affect, and negative emotion regulation predicted the increased use of emotion-related feeding styles and fewer mealtime routines. These variables, in turn, were found to predict children's unhealthful food consumption, documenting serial mediational influences. With respect to TV viewing, caregiver insecurity influenced child food consumption indirectly through its direct effect on child TV viewing. CONCLUSION:: Taken together, these data suggest that insecure attachment may put parents at a risk for using negative emotion regulation strategies in response to their children's distress, which may also have important implications for the interpersonal environment surrounding food and the development of children's early eating behaviors.",
keywords = "adult attachment style, emotion regulation, pediatric obesity",
author = "Bost, {Kelly K.} and Wiley, {Angela R.} and Barbara Fiese and Amber Hammons and Brent Mcbride and Kristin Harrison and Sharon Donovan and Diana Grigsby-Toussaint and Juhee Kim and Janet Liechty and Margarita Teran-Garcia",
year = "2014",
month = "1",
doi = "10.1097/01.DBP.0000439103.29889.18",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "35",
pages = "50--61",
journal = "Journal of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics",
issn = "0196-206X",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Associations between adult attachment style, emotion regulation, and preschool children's food consumption

AU - Bost, Kelly K.

AU - Wiley, Angela R.

AU - Fiese, Barbara

AU - Hammons, Amber

AU - Mcbride, Brent

AU - Harrison, Kristin

AU - Donovan, Sharon

AU - Grigsby-Toussaint, Diana

AU - Kim, Juhee

AU - Liechty, Janet

AU - Teran-Garcia, Margarita

PY - 2014/1

Y1 - 2014/1

N2 - OBJECTIVE:: The goal of this study was to test 3 serial mediation models of how caregiver adult attachment style influences children's food consumption through its influence on emotion regulation. Three mediators that have been shown to increase the risk for pediatric obesity and that are likely to be influenced by negative emotion regulation strategies in everyday family interactions were chosen: (1) caregiver feeding practices (2) family mealtime routines, and (3) child television (TV) viewing. METHOD:: A total of 497 primary caregivers of 2.5- to 3.5-year-old children reported on their own attachment style, typical responses to their children's negative affect, feeding styles, mealtime and TV viewing routines, and their children's consumption of healthful and unhealthful foods. RESULTS:: Insecure mothers were more likely to use punishing or dismissing responses to their children's negative affect, and negative emotion regulation predicted the increased use of emotion-related feeding styles and fewer mealtime routines. These variables, in turn, were found to predict children's unhealthful food consumption, documenting serial mediational influences. With respect to TV viewing, caregiver insecurity influenced child food consumption indirectly through its direct effect on child TV viewing. CONCLUSION:: Taken together, these data suggest that insecure attachment may put parents at a risk for using negative emotion regulation strategies in response to their children's distress, which may also have important implications for the interpersonal environment surrounding food and the development of children's early eating behaviors.

AB - OBJECTIVE:: The goal of this study was to test 3 serial mediation models of how caregiver adult attachment style influences children's food consumption through its influence on emotion regulation. Three mediators that have been shown to increase the risk for pediatric obesity and that are likely to be influenced by negative emotion regulation strategies in everyday family interactions were chosen: (1) caregiver feeding practices (2) family mealtime routines, and (3) child television (TV) viewing. METHOD:: A total of 497 primary caregivers of 2.5- to 3.5-year-old children reported on their own attachment style, typical responses to their children's negative affect, feeding styles, mealtime and TV viewing routines, and their children's consumption of healthful and unhealthful foods. RESULTS:: Insecure mothers were more likely to use punishing or dismissing responses to their children's negative affect, and negative emotion regulation predicted the increased use of emotion-related feeding styles and fewer mealtime routines. These variables, in turn, were found to predict children's unhealthful food consumption, documenting serial mediational influences. With respect to TV viewing, caregiver insecurity influenced child food consumption indirectly through its direct effect on child TV viewing. CONCLUSION:: Taken together, these data suggest that insecure attachment may put parents at a risk for using negative emotion regulation strategies in response to their children's distress, which may also have important implications for the interpersonal environment surrounding food and the development of children's early eating behaviors.

KW - adult attachment style

KW - emotion regulation

KW - pediatric obesity

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84892861575&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84892861575&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1097/01.DBP.0000439103.29889.18

DO - 10.1097/01.DBP.0000439103.29889.18

M3 - Article

C2 - 24356497

AN - SCOPUS:84892861575

VL - 35

SP - 50

EP - 61

JO - Journal of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics

JF - Journal of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics

SN - 0196-206X

IS - 1

ER -